Making Your Bug Out Vehicle Bug Out Worthy

In this article we’re going to be covering what it’ll take to make your bug out vehicle bug out worthy. If you’re looking for what makes the best bug out vehicle check out our article for that. Being preppers we’re always looking for ways of upgrading what we have so that they can serve us better during a bug out scenario. So we are going to go more in depth on the types of upgrades you can add to your bug out vehicle. Making the best bug out vehicle can be one of the most important investments you make as a prepper so lets get to it.

In this article we’re going to be covering what it’ll take to make your bug out vehicle bug out worthy. If you’re looking for what makes the best bug out vehicle check out our article for that. Being preppers we’re always looking for ways of upgrading what we have so that they can serve us better during a bug out scenario. So we are going to go more in depth on the types of upgrades you can add to your bug out vehicle. Making the best bug out vehicle can be one of the most important investments you make as a prepper so lets get to it.

Best Bug Out Vehicle Lighting Upgrades

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Lighting is a great way to make your bug out vehicle stand out (literaly) having lots of lights can attract a lot of attention if you need it and if you don’t you can always shut them off. There are loads of lights to use on your bug out vehicle. I’m going to start off by saying that you should go with LED’s if you’re going to be adding an upgrade you might as well make it last. LED’s are great they consume less power and often have a higher output of light that your regular halogen lights. Another thing I like about them is that if you crack a lens and water gets in you’re not going to immediately pop the bulb. Spot lights are a great for putting on your bug out vehicle you can put them almost anywhere you want. If you have a grill guard you can mount them directly to that or on the top your bug out vehicle mounted to a luggage rack. This gives you the capability of essentially making your bug out vehicle have 360 degrees of lighting. Amazon sells both a spot light and a combo pack with a spot and flood light they are reasonably priced too. The spot light goes for $20 and the combo pack sells for $40 be sure to pick up the wiring harness as well. These would make your bug out vehicle light the way very well.

Make Your Bug Out Vehicle Tough

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If you’re going to spend the money to get a bug out vehicle you’re going to want some way of protecting it. Think of it as a kind of insurance for your rig. Make your bug out vehicle tough by adding different types of guards. There are loads of different types of guards you can get one of the most important ones I think is some type of grille guard. This upgrade is going to make a bug out vehicle more resilient to damage in the front which is where a lot of important components are. In addition to grille guards there are bumper guards and tail light guards, these can also be great additions to your bug out vehicle and further increase the protection of your bug out vehicle. There are a few different styles and choosing which one is best for you can be a little bit tricky check out Auto Anything to learn how to find a guard that works for you. Winches are another accessory that will come in hand during a bug out scenario. These can be easily installed directly to your grille guard and are a great option if you have some extra money to put towards one.

Making Your Bug Out Vehicle Do The Work

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When you’re in a bug out scenario you generally want to carry as much gear as you can. Having a cargo rack allows your bug out vehicle to carry the gear for you. There are lots of different options out there I recommend going with a roof our hitch mounted cargo rack. With the addition of these you’re able to carry all the necessary gear you need to set up shop at your bug out location. The hitch mounted type cargo racks are great for loading up additional fuel and water. While the roof mounted racks can be used more for bug out bags, sleeping bags, food, etc. This will also free up more room inside the vehicle for either more gear or additional passengers. Curt makes some great roof mounted cargo racks that have good reviews on Amazon and Highland makes affordable hitch mounted racks that will stand up to any bug out scenario.

There are loads of options available on the market out there to make your bug out vehicle but out worthy. These are just some of the options that I would recommend you look into getting from the research and experience I’ve had. I hope this helps you in building the best bug out vehicle to get you out of any bug out scenario you might find yourself in. Thanks for reading and check back in for even more posts. If you have any comments or suggestions feel free to leave them in the comment section below.

What is a Comprehensive Wilderness Survival Kit and Why Should You Have One?

We all carry survival kits whether we realize it or not. The contents of a man’s pockets or those of a woman’s purse are nothing more than survival kits for a populated technological society. You have all the things you’ll likely need to fill your needs throughout your day. Keys, cash, identification, credit cards, membership cards and other items all serve to fill your needs as they arise. Luckily for us, most of our human needs are filled by technology and the remainder can be filled as you go with cash or credit.

We all carry survival kits whether we realize it or not. The contents of a man’s pockets or those of a woman’s purse are nothing more than survival kits for a populated technological society. You have all the things you’ll likely need to fill your needs throughout your day. Keys, cash, identification, credit cards, membership cards and other items all serve to fill your needs as they arise. Luckily for us, most of our human needs are filled by technology and the remainder can be filled as you go with cash or credit.

So how does a ‘wilderness survival kit’ differ from the items we carry every day? In a wilderness setting, we don’t have quick access to emergency medical care. We don’t have a roof over our head or a climate controlled environment. We don’t have sinks and water fountains bubbling with potable water or edible food everywhere we look. Therefore, we’ll need to carry most or all of these things with us. The ‘best’ wilderness survival kit is probably a backpack full of quality camping gear. However, most of us aren’t willing to carry that load when day hiking, mountain biking, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, riding ATV’s, hunting, horseback riding or any of the myriad other activities that carry us away from civilization.

The goal of a practical wilderness survival kit is therefore to address as many of our needs as possible and to do it in a format that we don’t mind carrying on our person while conducting outdoor activities. For some, this might be a small tin carried in a pocket, but these micro-kits don’t really address a lot of the most critical needs. For me, a belt pouch based kit is unobtrusive enough that I’m likely to carry it during outdoor activities. It is also big enough to really address human needs in the wild. I have several types of kits that I carry. Some are rudimentary, while some are very comprehensive. It really depends on where I’m headed. All of them are simple belt pouch based kits.

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At this point, let’s define what your critical needs really are and why. The easiest way to do this (and to prioritize the order in which you should address them) is by using a simple maxim known as the “rule of threes”.

The rule of threes says:

  •    It takes as little as 3 minutes to die of severe injury.
  •    It takes as little as 3 hours to die of exposure.
  •    It takes as little as 3 days to die of thirst.
  •    It takes at least 3 weeks to die of hunger.

Your very first priority in a survival situation is to address immediate first aid needs. If you or a companion cannot breathe, or are bleeding profusely, death can come in as little as three minutes. You aren’t likely to carry a comprehensive medical kit everywhere you go, but a wilderness survival kit should have at least the basics of first aid such as bandages and the ability to make a tourniquet. If you travel far and wide on a regular basis, it’s a very good idea to learn the basics of first aid (establishing an airway, dealing with profuse bleeding, CPR, etc).

Next, we have to deal with the number one killer in wilderness survival situations: exposure. When people become lost, stuck or injured in wilderness settings, they might have been well dressed for a leisurely day in the woods, but when night falls or unexpected weather blows in, they find themselves in a very dangerous situation.

Television shows about survival like to show people building rudimentary brush shelters and other forms of shelter using materials at hand. However, building a weatherproof shelter from scratch is incredibly time consuming. It takes 18-24 inches of brush overhead to effectively shed rain. This means it might take many hours (and a lot of energy) to build a decent shelter. If you’re lost, night is fast approaching and a freezing rain starts to fall, you don’t have that many hours!

This is why my survival kits include a tarp made of very thin plastic. This can be draped over a line strung between trees to form a small tent or simply draped over a bush in a pinch. That means that you can erect a waterproof, windproof shelter in minutes, not hours!  As mentioned, it’s incredibly thin plastic, so I can fold a 9′ by 6′ tarp into a packet about half the size of a deck of cards.

Beyond simple shelter, you’ll likely need a fire. Those same survival shows often portray various methods of primitive fire starting (bow drills, hand drills, ploughs, etc). However, if the weather has come in hard and things are becoming ‘wet ‘n’ wild’, you’re NOT going to get a fire going using primitive methods. These may be fun skills to practice as an educational exercise in your back yard, but relying on these methods to make fire in an actual emergency is stupid and it’s a great way to wind up dead.

A good survival kit should have multiple means to quickly build a fire. There should be a lighter, not matches. There should be easily-lit tinder that burns for a long time. In essence, if you can’t use a kit’s fire starting materials when it’s cold, wet and windy, it’s a useless kit!

Once you’re settled into a shelter and have a sustainable fire going, you’re going to eventually need water. In a desert environment, death from dehydration can come in a few days. In most environments, it takes nearly a week. Again, you don’t want to rely on a single source or method here. A good kit should have multiple means of gathering water, and multiple means of purifying it for drinking. My kits are packed in metal cook pots which can be used for boiling water. They also contain a water purification kit that can treat many gallons of water even if you can’t boil it. Finally, they have re-sealable water bags to transport water should you need to bring it with you.

We will come to food procurement, but there’s something else that falls outside the rule of threes. It’s not really a survival ‘need’, and doesn’t fit neatly into the rule, but it is at least as important. This is signaling. If you’ve been a responsible adult when it comes to your outdoor activities, you’ve informed responsible people of exactly where you were headed, and exactly when you should return. This means there will be people looking for you!

Signaling means making your profile in the woods into something bigger, louder, brighter, and the more obnoxious the better! A good survival kit contains whistles, flashlights, strobe markers, bright and/or reflective items, mirrors, etc. If you were smart and told people where you were going, your survival situation will likely last a matter of hours, or maybe an uncomfortable overnight stay before you are found.

Forget about the survival shows on television where they portray wilderness survival as some kind of bug-eating contest. As I’ve pointed out, food is really your last priority. You’d have had to really screw up to be in any real danger of starvation. For most of us, skipping a few meals might not be a bad thing when all is said and done! I make this the last priority when constructing a wilderness kit. I have some fish hooks and line, some snare wire and some slingshot bands that can be used to quickly construct a variety of small game hunting tools (you can make a slingshot, a propelled fishing spear, or use as the ‘spring’ for a trap/snare). Some kits even contain a spearhead that can be quickly and securely mounted on a shaft and used for fishing and/or small to mid sized game.

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In conclusion, I hope I’ve imparted some common sense into this subject. That means informing folks of your intentions. It means having at least a basic fundamental understanding of wilderness survival and how to prioritize and fulfill your needs should you find yourself in trouble. Finally, it means maintaining at least a basic level of preparedness when heading into untamed regions. When buying or building your own kit, make sure it fills your needs and that it’s something you’ll actually carry. As with other essential day to day ‘carry’ items… it’s better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it!

30 Uses For Trash Bags In Your Bug Out Bag

Deciding how to spend available funds in the preparedness budget is not any easy task. Multi-use items are always a favorite of wallet-conscious preppers. Trash bags, even the brand-name sturdy ones definitely fall within the “reasonably priced” category, but when we look past the obvious uses for the plastic bags, they become an even more advantageous contribution to our preps.

Deciding how to spend available funds in the preparedness budget is not any easy task. Multi-use items are always a favorite of wallet-conscious preppers. Trash bags, even the brand-name sturdy ones definitely fall within the “reasonably priced” category, but when we look past the obvious uses for the plastic bags, they become an even more advantageous contribution to our preps.

Trash bags are one of the most economical prepper “to do” list finds and literally dozens of potential disaster uses. In addition to being easy on the budget, trash bags are lightweight yet durable and take up very little space in bugout bags, INCH bags, and get home bags.

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Top 30 Uses For Trash Bags

  1. Put in bug out or get home bag to use as a poncho. Simply cut or carefully tear a hold for the head and even the arms, and one poncho is coming right up.
  2. Packing a tent or tarp for an emergency shelter is of course optimal — but such items take up a lot of space and are heavier as well. Even a one-person tent will not fit in a child’s backpack, but a trash bag and some duct tape surely will.
  3. Trash bags are also useful in keeping your shoes and feet dry. Open a trash bag, step inside and tie or secure with duct tape and keep rain and snow at bay. Storing several trash bags for emergency booties and a poncho inside a get home bag or bugout bag takes up very little space and adds virtually no weight to the pack.
  4. Keep your spare socks, change of clothes, and blankets dry with trash bags. The bags used to store these items can be turned into a poncho, bootie, or emergency shelter in mere minutes.
  5. During either a short or long-term disaster, trash bags can be used to safely store waste when commodes are not working. The bags work equally well for sharps and bloody cloth or bandages used to treat wounded. Preventing the spread of disease becomes even more important during a teotwawki scenario.
  6. Keep the rain off or your head with a makeshift trash bag hat.
  7. Make a fly screen for the front of your shelter with a trash bag — or two. Cut the trash bag into a sheet type form and then cut slits within a few inches of the top of the bag and you have a protective screen to keep the bugs away.
  8. Trash bags also make great ground cover. If you are using a tarp, or another trash bag for a shelter, placing another plastic bag onto the ground will prevent dampness from impacting your clothing. The trash bag also offers another layer between you at bugs which will come out of the ground seeking a food during the evening and early-morning hours.
  9. Although not exactly soft, trash bags can be used like thermal underwear under your clothing. Tape or tie piece of the bag around your legs, arms, and stomach beneath your clothing to prevent body heat from escaping quite so easily.
  10. Sure, they will be a bit flimsy and perhaps messy, but trash bags can be used to mix food or drink ingredients.
  11. Trash bags have also been successfully used as part of a solar water still.
  12. Although this is not US Coast Guard approved, some folks have reported success with trash bag life jackets — it is at least worth a shot during an emergency. Tie the ends of the trash bag together and blow air into it to inflate, then secure the open ends together as well. Tape or tie the back into a life jacket shape and use it to help keep your, your pets, or your get home bag afloat.
  13. Trash bags can also be used to store and transport food.
  14. Give your head a somewhat soft place to rest during an overnight hike home by inflating a trash bag and using it as a pillow.
  15. Trash bags can also be used as an emergency water container. The bags will hold a decent amount of weight, but will need to be carried carefully so the plastic does not tear and the water spill out onto the ground.
  16. Keep your sleeping bag and yourself dry and a little warmer by using a trash bag as a cover. To stay extra dry, slip into a sleeping bag like you would a potato sack for a race before getting into the sleeping bag as well.
  17. Mylar emergency blankets are inexpensive, lightweight, and take up little space, but trash bags can be used as a good substitute if more injured than expected need to be protected from the elements or shock.
  18. Trash bags can be hooked onto branches, or taped into place, to make a temporary sun shade. After taking the hiking break, carefully fold the trash bag into a small square so it can be used again during the next break period.
  19. Trash bags can also be used as a pressure bandage or a triangle bandage. The bags can also simply be used to cover a traditional bandage to help protect the wound from exposure to dirt or the bandage from exposure to the rain.
  20. Tie a splint with a trash bag, double the bag or tape two together to make a sturdier splint.
  21. In addition to being used as a makeshift water carrier, trash bags can also be used as a catch basin for water. Tie the bag to something mildly sturdy in an area exposed to the sky, or line a bucket or similar item with the bag, and capture enough water to keep yourself hydrated.
  22. Trash bags can also be used as patching for leads in other food and water containers. The plastic bags can be taped to cover worn spots or tears in bug out or get home bags too.
  23. Use trash bags to signal help. Tie or secure a white trash bag to a rock in a visible spot to let others know where you are. It is always a good idea to carry a permanent marker and spray paint to write messages.
  24. Trash bags can be used as plates. Find the most smooth and flat rock in the near vicinity and place a piece of the trash bag onto the rock for a clean eating surface.
  25. Use trash bags to tie onto trees for trail markers.
  26. Make a windsock with a trash bag.
  27. If an injured person, pet, or heavy gear needs to be moved, make a liter and line it with several trash bags.
  28. Make a banner with the trash bag to leave warning notes for others or to mark unsafe buildings. Tape, string, and marking materials will also be required.
  29. Fill a trash bag up with water, sit it in the sun for a while and then hang it from a sturdy branch to use for a shower. Heated water is also useful for cleaning wounds.
  30. Make a temporary backpack with a trash bag so the non-prepared person you come across during your trek home can help you carry the load. Be warned, the person could run off with your stuff, but if they are scared and unaware and you appear full of knowledge, the person will likely stick to you like glue.

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When packing the kiddos off to school, do not forget to include a few trash bags and other essential emergency items in their little backpacks as well. If your child or grandchild ever needs to spend the night at school or hoof it home or to a designated meeting spot, a few age-appropriate preps could be a life-saver.

Mommy, I Have to Go Potty! Make Your Own Emergency Toilet

We have talked about what we’ll do when the paper eventually runs out, but what about when the toilet doesn’t work anymore?

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We have talked about what we’ll do when the paper eventually runs out, but what about when the toilet doesn’t work anymore?

Consider this: You’ve had a major local disaster where the water has gone out. There is no water available to your house because water mains have been broken, the city water supply has been tainted and shut down, or one of the various other reasons that cause city-wide services to be shut down. What happens when Little Susie says she has to go to the bathroom?

Do you let her? Sure! In the beginning, it won’t be so hard. If you’ve got plenty of water stored up, you can use some of the non-potable water to pour it quickly into the bowl to help create a vacuum to flush your toilet. It’s kind of messy, and splashes a lot, which means you’ll have to clean up each time you do it. The real problem comes when the sewer lines become full and your poo isn’t going anywhere. Once that backup happens, it will be a stinky situation, in more ways than one.  (This would be a good time to think about filling your bathtub with water that can be used for non-potable things like watering plants and force flushing your toilet – you can also use a WaterBob to contain it if you don’t want to keep an open tub full of water.)

But it doesn’t take too long for the sewers to get backed up and you can’t flush any longer. THEN you’re in big trouble. Susie REALLY needs to go, but without a working sewer system, that potty water has no where to go. What on earth do you do now?

The problem you are faced with now is how to be able to go to the bathroom and not get your family sick and still not feel like your house smells like a sewer. You’ll always have to worry about cross-contamination of your water supply or communal area with human waste, so you’ll need a way to dispose of it safely and effectively.

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How to Make a Quick Emergency Toilet

Supplies:

  • 5 gallon bucket
  • Bag of scoopable kitty litter (regular works, too, but the scoopable helps alleviate urine better)
  • Heavy-duty garbage bags (you don’t want the cheap ones that easily rip
  • Toilet seat – these toilet seats are available at most camping stores and online. They fit most standard 5 gallon buckets you can get for a few bucks at your local DIY stores.
  • Toilet paper – unless of course you’ve come up with a few ideas of things to use when the toilet paper runs out!

Directions:

  1. Remove the metal handle from your 5 gallon bucket and thread the toilet paper roll on. Return the handle. This is an easy way to keep toilet paper handy without it getting dirty on the ground. Another great option is inside one of the plastic coffee cans  that can serve as a protective home for it.
  2. Fit a 13-gallon trash bag into your bucket and cinch it tight around the top.
  3. Place your toilet seat on top and secure into place.
  4. Keep kitty litter nearby in another waterproof canister

How to use the Emergency Toilet

  1. Pee or poo as you normally would.
  2. Take a scoop of cat litter and cover your ‘stuff’ up
  3. As bag becomes full for you, remove and cinch the top. You can then bury it in a safe location, well away from a water source

There’s an indoor option to this. You can turn off your water supply running into your toilet, empty out the water with one more flush, scoopy out any remaining water and drain it dry, and use a similar set up as the emergency toilet above. It will give everyone a little comfort of something familiar, even if the procedure is somewhat unfamiliar. You’ll want to be sure to plug up the hole to make sure no sewer gas smells seep out over time (just as if you were replacing the toilet and had to plug up the sewer hole). This is a great solution when you know this hack will only be needed for a short time.

For our family, though, this wasn’t going to be the best option for more than a few days. For one, it is hot more often than not. Our house is also not set up with a great ventilation system of cross breezes, etc., so the inside of the house can stay hot for a long time. Having a bucket of poo sitting in the house all the time isn’t the best option for us. So we’ve scoped out a place in our garage where we can make a potty station. If worse comes to worse, we also have a great nook on the outside of the house where we can set up a similar station if needed, including a bolt in the fence to stick the toilet paper on when we’re out there. That’s why we love this plan.

Storage

You can keep a small bag of scoopable litter, the trash bags, scoop, toilet paper and some cleaning wipes stored inside of your bucket with the seat nearby in the event of an emergency.

Things to consider

Someone taught me was using 2 buckets. One with the liner for your solid waste and one without the liner for your liquid waste. The liquid waste can be used in the yard or garden safely (as long as you don’t have someone who is carrying a major disease). Then you only really have to deal with the solid waste in your first bucket.

Consider a 2nd set up for your sick-room preps. You don’t necessarily want to be using the same ‘potty’ as someone who has a gastrointestinal issue. You need to cordone off an area as a sick room and make sure cleaning procedures are followed closely, including NOT disposing of the waste anywhere near your water source or where you are growing food.

You may want to find a way to stabilize your camp toilet. Besides using the pre-made versions that give you a little stability, you can use a milk crate + legs to give yourself less chance of tipping over.

The Pool Noodle Emergency Toilet

You’ve no doubt seen the Pinterest and Facebook phenomenon of the Pool Noodle Emergency Toilet. We made one up in about 3 minutes to show you how easy it is to set up.

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My son actually thought it was pretty comfy. But, it wouldn’t take long for that comfie to wear off as the noddle will eventually split from use, from weather, etc. Also, the minute you get that noodle dirty, it is forever contaminated. With all of the holes in the make up of the foam, you could never be certain you’ve completely sterilized OR sanitized it when cleaning. There is no lid so the waste is open all the time.

Ready Made Emergency Toilets

Campers everywhere have already come up with some awesome ideas for ready-made toilets that will be easy to store and use. There are also bags specially made for this set up  if you want to stock them specifically. But you can also think of things like bedside toilets that you would use for folks in a hospital that are on metal frames. They may not store as easy, and might need to be maintained a little differently by pouring the contents into a bucket set up each time, but would be easier for folks who need a little extra help up and down. You might also want to consider, if you’re having to use this for more than a few days in an open area,an enclosure to give yourself a little privacy.

Now don’t completely freak out over this stinky situation  This is one of those situations where it is easy to prepare yourself for a short term problem that probably won’t last more than a week or two. If, in the event of a major issue, you’ll want to look at some more permanent solutions like an outhouse. But for now, be ready for the most likely scenario!

11 Survival TV Shows Worth Watching

Plague, nuclear holocaust, and alien invasions! Whatever end-of-the-world / post-apocalyptic theme you can think of is on TV right now. But in the fray of TV shows for preppers, a lot of good shows have come and gone. If you feel like all of the best shows are canceled prematurely, no one shares your pain like we do. In this list, we want to focus on 11 survival TV shows (past and present) that we think are worth checking out.

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Plague, nuclear holocaust, and alien invasions! Whatever end-of-the-world / post-apocalyptic theme you can think of is on TV right now. But in the fray of TV shows for preppers, a lot of good shows have come and gone. If you feel like all of the best shows are canceled prematurely, no one shares your pain like we do. In this list, we want to focus on 11 survival TV shows (past and present) that we think are worth checking out.

1. Jericho (2006)

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This apocalyptic drama which aired back in 2006, was based on the story of a group of people in a little town in Kansas calledJericho as they struggle to survive the affects of nuclear fallout in several major cities around the U.S. The interesting twist to this show is that there is an underlying tone suggesting the government might have actually been complicit in the explosions. The town’s citizens come together to try to restore resources such as power and water and war with neighboring towns over debatable local resources. The writers did a great job with the story line and keep you hooked with the strength and vulnerability of each character. They also manage to sprinkle in some humor for good measure – not to mention the amazing soundtrack.

Jericho was suddenly canceled after the first season and was met with a barrage of complaints to CBS from the shows loyal fans. After launching a grassroots internet mega-campaign to revive the show CBS agreed to bring it back for one more season and at least wrap up some of the unanswered questions.

2. Falling Skies (2011)

In a world where civilization has been incapacitated by alien attack, we follow the story of a group of rag-tag survivors in the Boston area. In this post-apocalyptic world, there are no more electronics, military’s or major cities left, leaving only a handful of the world’s previous population to fight off the ongoing invasion. The odds are steep and survival is difficult when every day is is spent protecting and caring for the people, while also waging an insurgency campaign against an occupying alien force.

3. Survivors (2009)

Survivors is a British post-apocalyptic fiction drama that follows a similar premise as a lot of the other survival shows; the pandemic wipes out most of the population, society breaks down, people try to figure it all out. But what I really liked about this one is that they kind of make hero’s out of normal, everyday people who didn’t really even know they had it in them until it really came down to it. They were just normal people until things got crazy and forced them to rise to the occasion, which is what I think we’re going to see a lot of in the E.O.T.W.

4. The Colony (2009)

The Colony is a reality show on the Discovery Channel that originally aired in 2010. The show is basically a controlled experiment where a group individuals are placed in an isolated urban setting, where a hypothetical global catastrophe has occurred and the group has to try to rebuild with whatever they can find. They have basically an entire city to themselves and they can take over any property or resources they wish, but there are hired actors who act as thugs and looters to threaten and terrorize the members of the group to test their boundaries.

5. Out of the Wild: The Alaska Experiment

This is another Discovery Channel reality show where they pluck a group of city dwelling, urban professionals right out of their comfort zone and drop them by helicopter into the Alaskan outback smack-dab in the middle of winter. There are given limited supplies, a carry pack and a map to help them find their way to shelters along their route. If, at any time they sissy out and want to go home, all the have to do is hit their emergency GPS signal and a rescue helicopter will come get them out of there. I have to admit this show has taught me some really uniquesurvival skills that you might not see anywhere else like how to hunt for and prepare some rather unusual game like squirrels and porcupines. The show has just premiered for a third season which will take place in Venezeula. It should be interesting to see how the cast members fare in their new environment this time around.

6. Extreme Survival

While it only lasted 3 seasons, Extreme Survival with Ray Mears was an excellent wilderness survival show. Ray traveled to a diverse set countries all around the world, immersing himself in the culture and native survival techniques. Ray travels through the US, Canada, Italy, Brazil, India, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Russia, Australia and New Zealand. In addition to focusing on the native techniques, Ray also shares inspiring and sometimes horrifying survival stories that occurred in each area. There are dozens of shows and movies that Ray took part in, but this one should not be missed.

7. Man vs Wild

What makes Bear Grylls show so unique is the fact that he is willing to demonstrate some of the more strenuous or difficult survival techniques that most others would shy away from. He isn’t afraid to get down to the more nitty gritty aspects of survival that most of us would rather not have to think about like drinking your own urine to prevent dehydration or crossing a freezing cold river in the middle of winter. While it may seem a little over the top at times, I can’t help but think that there might be some point in our lives when we have to make a choice to do something disgusting or even painful in order to stay alive. You can’t help but respect the man for that.

8. Les Stroud “Survivor Man”

Les Stroud brings a humble quality to the realm of survival TV shows in Survivorman. Without any support staff or even a camera crew, he shows what it really takes to survive in the wilderness by yourself and with less than ideal supplies. From desert and swamp to the arctic mountains, Les has to survive for seven days, all on his own. But the difficult terrain doesn’t bring spirits down, Les keeps a positive and comedic attitude throughout each situation, making it feel more like a camping trip than a survival experience. You’ll come away from every episode with ancient survival techniques passed down from the natives of each area.

9. Surviving Disaster (2009)

What will you do when disaster strikes? Spike TV’s new original series Surviving Disaster, led by Navy SEAL Cade Courtley, vividly takes viewers through catastrophic scenarios and arms them with the knowledge needed to survive the unthinkable. Courtley tackles worst-case scenarios and equips viewers with the practical information needed to save their own lives and the lives of their loved ones. Whether the threat is natural or man-made or on a national or personal level, Courtley speaks directly to the viewers and guides them through a comprehensive, step-by-step process to not only survive the big picture disaster, but endure the many dangerous obstacles that may occur within each catastrophic event. While leading viewers out of danger, Courtley not only provides helpful tips and hands-on instruction, but swiftly points out common misconceptions and fatal mistakes. Unlike any other series, Surviving Disaster may actually save lives by providing actions that anyone can perform.

10. Jeremiah (2002)

This show is set in a post-apocalyptic future where all of the adult population was wiped out by a pandemic, leaving only kids to rule the world. We follow the main character “Jeremiah” played by Luke Perry as he tries to find out the real goal behind the pandemic and who is at fault. He partners up with a couple more hard core survivalists as they commandeer resources, discover hidden government bunkers and try to rebuild a broken nation.

The series ran from 2002 to 2004 on Showtime, but production stopped in 2003 when creative differences among the production companies couldn’t be resolved. The show wrapped up it’s second and final season in 2004 after a long hiatus off the air and resolved most of the plot threads from the first season.

11. Dual Survival (2010)

Wilderness survival takes on a new twist in Dual Survival when naturalist Cody Lundin and military-trained Dave Canterbury tackle tough terrain as a team. Each expert has experience in different types of survival situations, which exposes that classic question; how would a survival expert who’s never attempted this fair? It’s almost like seeing how you might respond in that extreme situation, which brings humanity to the show. You will also get to see how polar opposites might approach the same problem and be able to overcome it in completely different, yet successful, ways.

There are other TV shows like Naked and Afraid, Survivors, The Walking Dead, Storm Chasers, Combat Zone, and many, many more.  These are also all worth watching!

How To Make Pemmican: A Survival Superfood That Can Last 50 Years

Packed with calories and nutrition and able to be packed and stored for long periods, pemmican is often called the ultimate survival food.

Packed with calories and nutrition and able to be packed and stored for long periods, pemmican is often called the ultimate survival food.

Created by Native Americans and adopted by European explorers of the New World, pemmican is a concentrated blend of fat and protein from lean, dried meat. The word “pemmican” is derived from the Cree root word “pimi” for “fat” or “grease.” Traditionally, the meats used in pemmican included bison, moose, deer and elk.  Beef can be used as well.

The secret to pemmican’s long shelf life is in properly rendering the fat from the meat. The pemmican can be stored in airtight containers without refrigeration in a cool, dark and dry place. If made and stored property, it can last for years or even decades. There are reports of some pemmican lasting 50 or more years.

Let’s look at the steps to making pemmican.

1. Dry the meat. Cut off all the fat, and then slice the meat as thinly as possible before placing it on a drying rack in full sunlight. Another option is to place the meat directly on your oven rack with the oven temperature at its lowest setting. The meat needs to be dry enough that it cracks when you try to bend it. Adding salt will extend the shelf life. The more salt you add, the longer it will last.

2. Grind the meat. Now you need to grind the meat until it is powder form. If you do not have a food processor, mince the meat and then grind it in the blender. If you are in a survival situation, chop the meat into small bits and then crush it into a powder.

3. Render the fat. Now heat the fat in a crockpot, in the oven or on the stove. Use a low setting for several hours, and be sure to stir the fat occasionally until it has stopped bubbling. Then pour it through a mesh strainer to filter out any pieces.

4. Mix the meat with any dry extras. If you are using any nuts or dried fruit, such as raisins, dried cherries or cranberries, mix it with the dried meat in a large bowl (leaving room for the fat). Note: These extras reduce the shelf life.

5. Add the fat. Next, add one part of fat per every two parts of the dried meat mixture (add more fat if needed). Slowly pour the hot liquefied fat into the meat mixture and stir well.

6. Add any wet extras. If you are adding wet ingredients such as honey, maple syrup or peanut butter, mix them in now. If the mixture seems too wet, you can add a little almond meal to get it to your desired consistency. You also may add salt to taste if you like. Note: These extras will reduce the shelf life.

7. Form the pemmican. A popular method is to spread the mixture into a casserole dish. Let it get firm before cutting it into squares or bar sizes. If you prefer, you can form the mixture into balls.

8. Store the pemmican. Once cut, place it into airtight containers and store them in a cool, dark and dry place. You also store your pemmican in zippered bags in your freezer.

There are many varieties of pemmican, but they all use the basic instructions. Many other recipes begin with a 1:1:1 ratio of basic ingredients such as:

1 cup of dried meat

1 cup of dried fruit or berries

1 cup of melted animal fat

Pemmican is surprisingly filling and can supply energy for hours.

You can experiment to find the recipe that works well for you. Label the pemmican you make with the ingredients and proportions you used, so you will know what combinations work well and how you might want to tweak a certain recipe a little in the future.

5 Easy Tips On How To Make A PVC Blow Gun

Real quick before we get started, if you don’t know how to make a PVC blow gun (or even if you do), you need to watch this video first.

Not only is this a Do-It-Yourself project, but it’s also an incredibly cheap, effective, sturdy, and FUN gun to shoot (and, best part is you can practice shooting darts at home before you get yourself into a real survival situation).

Real quick before we get started, if you don’t know how to make a PVC blow gun (or even if you do), you need to watch this video first.

Not only is this a Do-It-Yourself project, but it’s also an incredibly cheap, effective, sturdy, and FUN gun to shoot (and, best part is you can practice shooting darts at home before you get yourself into a real survival situation).

Now you might be wondering, “Well that’s great and all, but how is that really going to help me in a survival situation?” Little do you know blowguns have been used to hunt game for thousands of years. In fact, it’s one of the most primitive weapons the world has used.

You might not be able to take down a bear with one of these bad boys, mind you, but you can certainly go after small game with your own homemade blowgun and darts.

Aside from hunting game, these PVC blow guns are great for protecting your home and your garden as well. The darts are astonishingly quiet, leaving you the ability to sneak up to your window (or the perpetrator) unannounced and get their attention real quick. If you’re in a dangerous situation, this could help give you the advantage and allow you to take matters into your own hands.

I like to make things simple for you. And while written instructions for making a blowgun are useful a video with instructions is even easier to follow.

Check out how to make a pvc blowgun.

1.) Take Your Time:

The PVC blow gun fires its darts silently, so your game won’t know what’s coming until it’s too late. Plus, you can quickly fire one dart after another, so take your time and make sure to aim correctly.

2.) Get An Upgrade:

Once you’ve mastered the basics with a PVC pipe, you can move on to a steel or aluminum pipe instead. These materials are tougher than PVC, and are sturdy enough to not bend quite as easily when you’re handling it.

3.) Utilize Your Spare Time For Target Practice:

Now that you’ve made your very own weapon, you’re going to want to be sure how to use it and use it well (luckily these guys are fun to use, so you’ll want to practice). Grab an old dart board to do some target practice on your off-time; it’ll prepare you well for the long-term.

4.) Change Up Your Darts:

Nail darts are effective, but they’re not the only solution. Bamboo skewers (like for kabobs) can be used, as well as black locust wood, which is traditionally used in the southeast due to its weight and strength.

5.) Keep It SAFE:

Blow guns are fun, but they’re NOT toys. They should be treated with respect, just like any other weapon. When misfired, projectiles shot at close range can cause bleeding and infection – not to mention loss of private/public property if you hit a window (or the neighbor’s cat) by mistake. Use caution and common sense when operating this blow gun.

Now we recognize that sometimes, well, life happens. And when life happens, either the arrow doesn’t quite hit the target, the target moved, or someone was just being outright dumb.

When you think about it, and all the randomness and curveballs life throws at you, you really can’t afford tonot have one of these first-aid kits around.

Budget Friendly Ground Beef Jerky Recipe

Homemade ground beef jerky is easy and economical. You can use lean beef or venison – whichever you have available – and common pantry ingredients (except the liquid smoke, which I did buy just for jerky making). My jerky gun came with seasoning and cure packets, but these were full of all the ingredients I’m trying to avoid in commercial jerkies (MSG, hydrolyzed soy protein, nitrates, etc.).  (Those little packets are expensive, too, if you purchase them separately.)

Homemade ground beef jerky is easy and economical. You can use lean beef or venison – whichever you have available – and common pantry ingredients (except the liquid smoke, which I did buy just for jerky making). My jerky gun came with seasoning and cure packets, but these were full of all the ingredients I’m trying to avoid in commercial jerkies (MSG, hydrolyzed soy protein, nitrates, etc.).  (Those little packets are expensive, too, if you purchase them separately.)

Do you need a jerky gun to make jerky with ground beef?  Nope – but it’s rather handy and somewhat entertaining.

Why Use Ground Beef for Homemade Jerky Instead of Beef Strips?

I prefer ground beef jerky for three main reasons:

  1. It’s cheaper. I can get ground beef or venison much cheaper than a roast.
  2. It’s easier to make. Working the jerky gun or rolling the meat out thinly is much easier than wrestling to cut strips out of a piece of meat with bone and connective tissue intact.
  3. It’s easier to chew. Eating a piece of regular beef jerky can sometimes be like chewing on an old shoe, especially when there’s a lot of connective tissue. Ground beef jerky has the meaty, salty jerky taste we love without the bits that get stuck in your teeth.

This recipe has been adapted from Mary Bell’s Complete Dehydrator Cookbook – “All American Marinated Beef Jerky”.  Mary makes hers with beef strips, but it worked well as a ground beef jerky recipe, too.  For the soy sauce, I prefer grain free organic tamari. Most soy in the US that is not organically grown is genetically modified, and non-organic wheat may be sprayed with glyphosate prior to harvest.

Homemade Ground Beef Jerky Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon liquid smoke
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 pound lean ground beef or venison

Directions

In a glass bowl, combine all ingredients and let sit (refrigerated) for at least two hours.  I mixed this up at bedtime and let it sit until after lunch the next day, and it wasn’t too strong.

Load the mixture in the jerky gun and use the gun to load your dehydrator trays.  I do recommend using the mesh inserts or fruit leather trays for your dehydrator. This mixture is fairly soft because of the added liquid, which makes it easier to fire through the gun.

If you don’t have a jerky gun, roll the mixture out very thinly (1/8 inch thick) and score lines where you would like the pieces to break apart.

Dry at 145° – 165° F (63° – 74° C) for 4 to 12 hours, until jerky is hard but still flexible and contains no pockets of moisture. For extra safety, heat finished jerky in a 275° F (135° C) oven for 10 minutes.

Jerky will last in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 – 2 months. For longer storage, place in an airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer. Vacuum sealing will extend shelf life.

How Much Homemade Jerky Do You Get from One Pound of Raw Meat?

The weight of the jerky will decrease by about two-thirds during the drying time, so for every pound of raw meat you use, you’ll get around one-third pound of finished homemade jerky.

How Can I Be Sure My Jerky is Safe to Eat?

The University of Wisconsin suggests the following two options for safe jerky making at home:

  1. Dry meat at 145° – 155°F for at least 4 hours followed by heating in a preheated 275°F oven for 10 minutes. Drying meat at a temperature below 145°F will produce a product that looks done before it is heated enough to destroy pathogens, and before it has lost enough moisture to be shelf-stable.Only a few dehydrators currently on the market will maintain the necessary temperature of 145° – 155°F: the Gardenmaster by Nesco/American Harvest and the Excalibur are two such units. Each of these units has a large heating element, strong air flow, and adjustable temperature setting. Dry for at least 4 hours (6 hours is preferable) and remove jerky from the dehydrator. Place dried strips on a baking sheet, close together but not touching or overlapping. Heat in a pre-heated 275°F oven for 10 minutes to an internal temperature of 160°F – strips thicker than ¼” (when raw) may require longer to reach 160°F. In our research, strips removed from the oven were sizzling hot. Remove oven-heated samples from the oven, cool to room temperature, and package. Always include the post‐drying oven‐heating treatment as a safety precaution.
  2. Steam or roast meat strips in marinade to an internal temperature of 160°F before drying; heat poultry to 165°F (internal temperature) before drying. The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline currently recommends this method for making safe jerky. The pre‐heating step assures that any bacteria present will be destroyed before drying and a lower dehydrator temperature (130° to 140°F) can be used. After boiling, dehydrate meat for 4 to 6 hours. No post-dehydration oven-heating is necessary. Since it can be impossible to accurately measure the internal temperature of a thin strip of meat, consumers can boil meat in marinade (or water) for 5 minutes before drying. Unfortunately, this USDA‐recommended method produces a dried, crumbly product that would be judged inferior by Wisconsin standards for chewy, flexible jerky.

Do I Need a Dehydrator to Make Jerky?

No, it is possible to dry jerky in the oven.

Process homemade jerky in a 250° F (120° C) oven with the door slightly open for 2.5 hours. Rotate baking sheet and bake for three hours more.

You may be able to reduce drying time slightly by flipping the jerky over at the 2.5 hour mark so the underside of the jerky is exposed.

With the Excalibur dehydrator, a batch of jerky is done in about 4-6 hours, depending on the humidity level. Drying overnight gets the jerky a little too dry for my taste. It’s still good, but a little too crumbly.

The last time we made jerky, my eldest mixed up the jerky marinade and meat one day and my youngest loaded up the Excalibur the next morning. The jerky gun makes nice, thin strips about an inch wide when you use the “double barrel” attachment.  The gun also has option of a single wide strip or a tube shape.

We made some of the wide strips (he wanted to try the different barrels) and perforated them with a thin bladed spatula so they broke apart easily when dry. (You can use this same scoring technique for jerky that’s rolled out instead of made with a jerky gun.)

Scoring the jerky Scoring the jerky After drying, the jerky breaks easily apart.   After drying, the jerky breaks easily apart.

This has become one of my favorite snack foods since we’ve been working to reduce our carbohydrate and grain intake.  It’s relatively quick and easy to make, and the gun was pretty inexpensive.

Do you have a favorite jerky recipe?  Have you tried making jerky with ground beef?  Has anyone tried making jerky out of organ meats?  I’d love to hear from you.

Ground Beef Jerky

Easy and economical jerky recipe that’s great for lean beef or venison.

Ingredients

  1. 1/2 cup soy sauce
  2. 1 teaspoon liquid smoke
  3. 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  4. 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  5. 1 teaspoon sea salt
  6. 1 pound lean ground beef or venison

Instructions

  1. In a glass bowl, combine all ingredients and let sit (refrigerated) for at least two hours. I mixed this up at bedtime and let it sit until after lunch the next day, and it wasn’t too strong.
  2. Load the mixture in the jerky gun and use the gun to load your dehydrator trays. I do recommend using the mesh inserts or fruit leather trays for your dehydrator. This mixture is fairly soft because of the added liquid, which makes it easier to fire through the gun.
  3. If you don’t have a jerky gun, roll the mixture out very thinly (1/8 inch thick) and score lines where you would like the pieces to break apart.
  4. Dry at 145° – 165° F (63° – 74° C) for 4 to 12 hours, until jerky is hard but still flexible and contains no pockets of moisture. For extra safety, heat finished jerky in a 275° F (135° C) oven for 10 minutes.

Notes

  1. Jerky will last in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 – 2 months. For longer storage, place in an airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer. Vacuum sealing will extend shelf life.
  2. Ingredients
  3. 1/2 cup soy sauce
  4. 1 teaspoon liquid smoke
  5. 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  6. 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  7. 1 teaspoon sea salt
  8. 1 pound lean ground beef or venison
  9. Instructions
  10. In a glass bowl, combine all ingredients and let sit (refrigerated) for at least two hours. I mixed this up at bedtime and let it sit until after lunch the next day, and it wasn’t too strong.
  11. Load the mixture in the jerky gun and use the gun to load your dehydrator trays. I do recommend using the mesh inserts or fruit leather trays for your dehydrator. This mixture is fairly soft because of the added liquid, which makes it easier to fire through the gun.
  12. If you don’t have a jerky gun, roll the mixture out very thinly (1/8 inch thick) and score lines where you would like the pieces to break apart.
  13. Dry at 145° – 165° F (63° – 74° C) for 4 to 12 hours, until jerky is hard but still flexible and contains no pockets of moisture. For extra safety, heat finished jerky in a 275° F (135° C) oven for 10 minutes.
  14. Notes
  15. Jerky will last in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 – 2 months. For longer storage, place in an airtight container in the refrigerator or freezer. Vacuum sealing will extend shelf life.

Survivalism Goes Mainstream

The day starts just like any other.  You wake up, get dressed and make your way into work, fighting the stress of the morning commute just like everyone elsetrapped in their cars on the gridlocked highway.  You finally arrive at work and settle in to start your day.  All of a sudden you hear a loud rumbling sound. At first you think it might just be a large truck driving by or something else shaking the ground.  But then the sound gets louder and the rumbling becomes more violent.  The lights go out, the shaking continues for a minute and then everything goes silent.  The next thing you know people are running outside in a panic, the shaking has started again but this time it’s a lot worse and you can’t keep your footing.  Books start flying off the shelves in your office as you try to make your way for the door.  “Could it be an earthquake?” you think to yourself.

The day starts just like any other.  You wake up, get dressed and make your way into work, fighting the stress of the morning commute just like everyone elsetrapped in their cars on the gridlocked highway.  You finally arrive at work and settle in to start your day.  All of a sudden you hear a loud rumbling sound. At first you think it might just be a large truck driving by or something else shaking the ground.  But then the sound gets louder and the rumbling becomes more violent.  The lights go out, the shaking continues for a minute and then everything goes silent.  The next thing you know people are running outside in a panic, the shaking has started again but this time it’s a lot worse and you can’t keep your footing.  Books start flying off the shelves in your office as you try to make your way for the door.  “Could it be an earthquake?” you think to yourself.

This is the scenario that has happened in numerous towns across America and people are starting to wake up to the possibility that it actually might just happen to them.  The trend towards emergency preparedness or “survivalism” has really started to take hold in recent years due to a number of natural disasters, mass shootings and other public safety threats that have come to the forefront.  This idea has been perpetuated by television shows such as AMC’s Walking Dead and TLC’s Doomsday Bunkers.  While some think that people with the preparedness or “Prepper” mentality are just paranoid tin-hat wearing fools, others have really latched on to the idea and started to incorporate emergency preparedness tactics into their everyday lives.  Is the recent infatuation with survivalism and emergency preparedness a valid, relevant movement that deserves a further look?  Or does it simply promote a fear mentality for people in an already insecure world.  Is there a need to prepare for the unexpected in today’s world or is the whole idea being oversold?  If history repeats itself as they say it always does, then we can look at examples of disasters throughout recent years to determine if preparing is a wise and necessary venture.  Otherwise this trend would be nothing less than a marketing tactic to push products that will likely never be needed.

What is “Survivalism”?

Wikipedia defines emergency preparedness or “survivalism” as “a movement of individuals or groups (called survivalists or preppers) who are actively preparing for emergencies, including possible disruptions in social or political order, on scales from local to international. Survivalists often acquire emergency medical and self-defense training, stockpile food and water, prepare to become self-sufficient, and build structures (e.g., a survival retreat or an underground shelter) that may help them survive a catastrophe.”

The possibilities for calamity are seemingly endless in today’s world.  From nuclear threats to economic disaster, it seems as though there is always something to be worried about.  In such an uncertain environment, it would seem to be a wise choice to insure the safety of your family by stocking up on a few extra items that could possibly save your life one day.  We purchase health insurance to protect against a major injury and life insurance to protect our families in the event of an unexpected death so why not buy insurance to protect against the effects of a major disaster?  This move towards individual responsibility for your own well being is long overdue and will likely continue to expand over the next several years.

How Real is the Threat?

During Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, many families were left stranded without adequate food or water supplies.  Some were lucky enough to evacuate to higher ground before the flooding hit but others weren’t so lucky.  Circumstances in the local emergency shelters were less than adequate and sometimes even dangerous.  Only those who had taken responsibility for their own personal safety were able to weather the storm unscathed.  Just a few simple preparations such as extra food, clean water and medical supplies made all the difference when it came down to a real emergency.

Several studies have been conducted by Citizen Corps regarding emergency preparedness trends among governments, businesses and households in America. These surveys found that individuals and households are aware of the seriousness of a natural disaster, and say that they are willing to prepare for one, but relatively few households have acted to mitigate losses and reduce injury. With so much evidence pointing out the importance in being prepared in today’s society, it’s hard to understand why anyone would choose not act to protect themselves and their families in the event of a disaster.

Many people argue against preparedness citing paranoia and unrealistic expectations. This is especially true when you talk about preparing for societal collapse or doomsday. But preparedness extends far beyond zombies and bunkers. Preparedness could be as simple as knowing how to fix your car or having adequate food and lighting for your family if the power went out for days or weeks.

People may be able to argue about the various reasons to prepare, however one thing is clear; preparedness is smart, practical and useful.  Whether you are preparing for something as extreme as the apocalypse or something as simple as a power outage, being prepared mitigates trouble, saves money and could mean the difference between life and death in an emergency situation.

Someone once asked the founder of the Boy Scouts,  Robert Baden-Powell about the motto of the scouts “Be prepared”.  “Be prepared for what?” they asked. Baden-Powell responded “Why, for any old thing”. Being prepared for life and the chaotic challenges it throws at you and allows you to life happy, stress free and without regret.  If buying a few extra supplies means a happy, stress free life you can count me in!

Herbal Wound Care Options

Wound care should be an important part of your first aid preparedness training. After all, what may be a harmless paper cut by today’s standards could set the stage for infection in a less sanitary environment. Furthermore, if access to higher medical care were interrupted, there would be no ambulance or life flight, and maybe even no emergency room, to provide care for more serious wounds and injuries.

Wound care should be an important part of your first aid preparedness training. After all, what may be a harmless paper cut by today’s standards could set the stage for infection in a less sanitary environment. Furthermore, if access to higher medical care were interrupted, there would be no ambulance or life flight, and maybe even no emergency room, to provide care for more serious wounds and injuries.

First aid for wounds covers many different aspects. Especially in a SHTF scenario, you would need to know how to safely control bleeding, assess the injury to gauge extent of the damage, and be able to clean the wound and prevent infection. Wilderness first aid or first responder training can be invaluable because there is so much to learn on this topic. Being able to learn from an instructor in these courses is also extremely helpful- they will correct any errors you might make and often have a great deal of  personal experience to make the material more relatable.

In long term scenarios with no higher medical care, the prevention of infection becomes a crucial step in the healing process. By using herbs to encourage healthy wound healing and support the immune system, you have a back-up plan in case medical supplies run short.

There are five basic types of herbs to keep in mind for herbal wound support: Hemostatics that curb excessive bleeding; anti-inflammatory herbs for healthy inflammation response; proliferative herbs that help with scabbing and the formation of new skin; anti-pathogenics that help minimize contamination of the wounds, and lymphatic herbs that support a healthy immune response. We will also briefly cover helpful pain relieving herbs.

Let’s take a look at the five main groups of herbs for wound care:

Herbal Hemostatics

Most herbs that have hemostatic properties are classified as astringents in traditional herbalism. These are herbs with a reputation for drawing up and tightening tissues, and drying up excessive fluids of all types. Traditional wound herbs utilized for their hemostatic properties include the leaves and flowers of shepherd’s purse, oak bark, wild geranium root, yarrow leaf and/or flower, raspberry or blackberry leaf or blackberry root, and chaparral leaf.

White oak and English oak are the two “official” oak species used in herbal medicine, but all oaks exhibit a high level of tannins and can be used interchangeable for their astringency. These herbs may be prepared as an infusion or decoction and applied as a wash, or if an extract is available it can be diluted in water and applied equally well. These herbs are also beneficial for oozing or weepy wounds or sores.

Herbal Anti-Inflammatories

These herbs may be applied topically alone or as part of a formula to encourage excessive inflammation to return to normal. Inflammation is a natural part of the healing process, but if the wound is large these herbs can help with comfort during the healing process, and help the tissue recover from pain and swelling. Several of them can also be found under the antipathogenic category, and under pain relievers. Examples of herbal anti-inflammatories include willow, meadowsweet, chaparral, lobelia, self heal, comfrey, plantain, birch, alder, aspen, poplar, and turmeric.

Proliferatives

Herbs that encourage the growth of healthy tissue during the growth process are also important. Chaparral, comfrey, horsetail, plantain, calendula, and aloe are great examples of this type of herb. It’s important to use proliferatives judiciously over deep wounds, as they can promote healing of the top layers of the epidermis before the wound has healed completely underneath. This could set the stage for infection. Be sure that the wound is clean and has started to heal well internally and that there is no chance of infection before using them.

Comfrey and calendula can promote healthy tissue growth when there is a concern that scar tissue could be damaging. These herbs have a traditional reputation for helping a wound to heal with minimal scarring. Elecampane root can be beneficial when there is “proud flesh,” meaning the wound is having difficulty forming a healthy scab (7). Stinging nettle can be taken internally as a tea, or eaten as a steamed green, during the healing process as this herb supplies micro-nutrients and protein that support the healing process (2,4).

Anti-Pathogenics

Antipathogenics are herbs that help keep the wound clean from bacterial contamination. Note that these are not going to behave in the same manner as an internal, systemic antibiotic. They need to be applied topically. Chaparral, plantain, acacia, aloe, echinacea, goldenseal, and sida are examples here. Even though goldenseal is listed, it’s important to understand that the berberine content in goldenseal does its best work topically. It’s not well absorbed into the bloodstream from the gut.

Learn More: If you would like to read more about the few herbs that do seem to have a systemic anti-pathogenic effect, you can visit my blog to read this article on Herbal Antibiotics: What You Really Need To Know. But you also need to learn about herbal lymphatics.

Herbal Lymphatics

Because there are very few herbs that have a systemic action approaching modern antibiotics, we turn to another staple in the prepared herbalist’s medicinals kit: Herbal lymphatics. These herbs work with our bodies to support the effectiveness of our immunity through our lymphatic system. If you’ve ever experienced swollen lymph glands during a fever or infection, you know first hand how hard these glands work during an immune system challenge.

Herbal lymphatics promote the movement of lymph and the ability of the body to drain off and process the byproducts of infection. Poke root, blue flag, echinacea, red root, boneset, and cleavers are herbs in this class. Alteratives, or blood purifiers, such as burdock and red clover, can support lymphatic herbs. Lymphatics can be applied as compresses over swollen lymph glands, but it is usually more practical to take them internally. Poke and blue flag are generally used in small amounts, even only a few drops at a time, due to their potency and potential toxicity. Cleavers is a very safe lymphatic that may also be eaten as a steamed green.

Herbal Support for Pain

The last topic we need to cover for herbal wound care is the problem of pain. Everyone has a different pain tolerance, but the topic of pain should be taken seriously during wound care in a SHTF scenario. Pain places more stress on an already stressed system, and can interfere with sleep and appetite. Adequate rest and nutrition are important for healing in any scenario, but especially in an emergency situation where no higher care is available. The same can be said for managing stress in what is most likely a very stressful environment to begin with. Herbs that have a tradition of use for pain include Jamaica dogwood (1), meadowsweet, willow, and black cohosh (5).

Applying Herbs in a Wound Care Scenario

In addition to knowing first aid skills and what herbs to use, you also need to know how to use the herbs. Now that you have a basic understanding of the types of herbs that could be used for wound care, you may still be curious about how the herbs would be applied.

As a general rule, the two most practical herbal preparations in any SHTF scenario are going to be extracts (sometimes called tinctures); and infusions or decoctions. Extracts are made by soaking herbal material in alcohol (if made at home, it’s common to use Everclear mixed with water or vodka), which preserves the herbs and pulls the beneficial components into the liquid. Teas made with herbs are known as infusions (for fresh or dried leaves and flowers) and decoctions (for fresh or dried roots, barks, and seeds). Both types of preparations have the flexibility of either external or internal use (depending on the herb). Extracts are most commonly used internally, but may be diluted in a small amount of water to create a wash or applied without dilution if needed.

Some of the herbs listed above, like Jamaican dogwood, poke root, and chaparral, are at one end of the herbal safety spectrum and are called for in only small amounts at a time. Herbs like burdock and cleavers fall on the opposite end of the spectrum and are safe enough to be foraged as food. Most fall somewhere in the middle, but it’s important that you become familiar with each herb you plan to use during emergency situations so that you understand the plant’s unique profile as well as how much to use.

Survival Supply Caches

If you need to stash some gear or supplies then you need to consider Survival Supply Caches, the Prepper’s Safe Deposit Box!

There are many choices and schools of thought when it comes to survival caches. If you want to bury things, you can choose a pre-made solution like the Mono Vault tube,  designed for this very purpose, or leverage buckets with water-tight lids, rain barrels or PVC pipe solutions.

If you need to stash some gear or supplies then you need to consider Survival Supply Caches, the Prepper’s Safe Deposit Box!

There are many choices and schools of thought when it comes to survival caches. If you want to bury things, you can choose a pre-made solution like the Mono Vault tube,  designed for this very purpose, or leverage buckets with water-tight lids, rain barrels or PVC pipe solutions.

PVC Burial Cache

PVC Burial Cache The quick and easy method would be to run down to your local hardware store and get some properly size PVC pipe and the fittings needed to create your own burial tube.

Make sure to use some form of thread compound or Teflon tape to ensure that water doesn’t work its way into your container. Be sure to use some zip lock bag, dry bags or vaccum pack all the items you want to keep safe.

Options for Hiding Cache:

First you need a plan. Where are you going to put your cache?

Hide It:

Wrap it with camouflage tape or wrap and tie it to a high tree limb or stick it in a hollow tree.

Bury It:

Dig a hole, someplace far from prying eyes.

Caching OpSec Considerations:

 

Make sure you find and retrieve your cache. Landmarks can change, so make sure you know exactly where it is, and that you will be able to find it again, when you need it!

Bury the tube in a remote location, where you can’t be observed, including aerial observation, and cell phone tracking. Leave the cell phone at home, or at a minimum remove the battery, or boot the phone into DFU mode (Device Firmware Update), which shouldn’t have any drivers loaded, except for the USB input and internal storage access. 3G, 4G and GPS, should be inactivated…but this might change in the future.

A water proof container will likely be buoyant. Make sure to bury it in a place where ground water or rain, won’t force it back to the surface, exposing your dry box or tube. Avoid soils heavy in clay, as water doesn’t drain quickly and may exacerbate “floating”!

If you are burying metallic items or using a dry box or tube that is metal, make sure yo bury your vault deeper, then salt the vicinity with metal scrap such as old engine parts, nails, nuts, bolts, food tins, soda cans or other debris that might encounter in the area, or bury it in an area where metal is expected to be encountered. These ideas apply to your own property. We do not condone any activity, like littering on public property. Please verify any applicable federal, state, or local laws.

Types of Caches

 

There are 4 main types of caches, there might be more, but these are the ones we consider most likely to be needed.

1.       Waypoint Caches

2.       Exile Caches

3.       Fugitive Caches

4.       Weapons Caches

Waypoint Cache

 

Waypoint Caches are hidden supplies at intervals along your route, allowing you to restock on an extended journey. This would likely be food, water or water purification essentials and other reloads for consumable goods.

When we are discussing a Waypoint Cache to resupply a motor vehicle, we need to consider the nature of this kit and its size. You won’t be able to bury it all, so maybe use a storage unit for the larger items, unless you know of another good spot or two along your way.

If you intend to drive to your location, this cache would also likely include tools for your vehicle, tire repair kits, fuel and essential automotive fluids.

Waypoint Cache:

 

·         Cordage (paracord)

·         Duct Tape

·         MRE’s, FlexGrub, or Dehydrated camping meals

·         More fuel pellets (if you have a stove that requires these)

·         H2O 1.0 personal water straw

·         Shoe goo or other shoe repair materials

·         Clean socks and undergarments (a couple pairs can make a big difference)

·         Fishing Gear

·         Slingshot or repair kit for a slingshot (bands)

·         Survival Knife ( a SOG Seal Pup and Morakniv would be perfect, or use any spare rugged knife)

·         Sharpening stone, whet stone, and honing oil (for knife maintenance)

·         Multi-tool (Gerber)

·         More batteries for your handheld ham radio

·         Replacement headlamp and batteries

·         Replacement flashlight and batteries

·         Additional First Aid kit supplies

·         Grooming and Hygiene kit refills (razors, soaps, toothpaste, floss, feminine hygiene, etc)

·         Insect Repellent

·         Sun Screen

·         Replacement compass

·         Ranger beads

·         Maps of area or region

·         Backpack repair kit

·         Pre-paid cell phone and additional battery

·         More cash

 

 

Automobile Waypoint Cache:

·         Tire pump

·         Tire patch or repair kit

·         Spare tire(s)

·         Spare jack and universal tire iron

·         Extra fuel with stabilizer added

·         Extra oil

·         Transmission fluid

·         Jumper cables

·         Replacement belts

·         Replacement headlamps and bulbs

·         Battery?

·         Wipers and wiper fluid

·         Tool kit for auto repairs

·         First aid kit

·         MRE’s or Dehydrated camping meals

·         Water or water purification tools (H2O 1.0 personal water straw)

*You should already have a base set of car supplies in your Automobile’s EDC kit*

Exile Cache

 

Exile Caches are hidden supplies that allow you to cover all your survival needs, if you are forced to flee with nothing, or return to your home to find it inaccessible or occupied by non-familiar individuals.

This cache would provide what you need if you were at zero. It would have ways to provide for shelter, fire, food, water and protection.

Exile Cache Contents:

·         Cordage (paracord)

·         Duct Tape

·         Nylon Tarp (light and more compact tarp)

·         Tiny camp stove

·         Water container (Stainless steel for boiling)

·         Personal water straw

·         Military rain poncho and poncho liner (woobie)

·         Heavy duty space blanket

·         Slingshot

·         Fishing gear

·         Survival knife (a SOG Seal Pup and a Morakniv would be perfect, or any knife)

·         Multi-tool (Gerber)

·         Handheld ham radio

·         Headlamp and batteries

·         Flashlight and batteries

·         First Aid Kit

·         Grooming and Hygiene kit

·         Insect Repellent

·         Sun Screen

·         Hat

·         Sunglasses or goggles

·         Bandana or Shemagh

·         Gloves

·         Compass

·         Ranger beads

·         Maps of area

·         Small towel

·         Backpack or Dayback, You could forgo the backpack if you tied cord around the burial tube and used it to carry your supplies.

·         Pre-paid cell phone

·         Cash

Fugitive Cache

 

Fugitive Caches are made up of select essentials from the Exile Cache with some extra specific purpose gear, in the event that you are on the run, for whatever reason. Maybe you saw or overheard something sensitive and a mega corporation has deployed assassins to take you down or some government agency has decided that they need to terminate you with extreme prejudice Whatever the reason, you have to stay alive and on the move until you can clear your name.

The Fugitive Cache may not have to be buried, but could be in a self storage locker, if you can find one that lets you rent without an ID…unless you have an alternate ID <wink, wink> or a discreet friend who would let you share some storage space.

Fugitive Cache Contents:

 

·         Cordage (paracord)

·         Duct tape

·         Knife (Combat knife or dagger)

·         Multi-tool (Gerber)

·         Flashlight and batteries

·         First Aid Kit

·         Grooming and Hygiene kit

·         Bandana or Shemagh

·         Gloves

·         Compass

·         Ranger beads

·         Maps of area or objectives

·         Cash

·         Hair coloring

·         Other disguise stuff (fake mustache, beard, colored contacts, etc)

·         Ball cap and sunglasses

·         Burner phone

·         Alternate IDs (passport, driver’s license, etc….You know, like the spies on TV)

·         Lots of Cash (bribes, payoffs, transportation, a place to lay low, etc)

Weapon Caches

 

Weapon Caches are used by those who aren’t so sure that their firearms are safe. Burying some of your firearms in a remote area ensures that they will still be accessible regardless of the current laws or political climate.

Most firearms cost many hundreds of dollars if not thousands, so you should probably go the extra mile and buy a container, like a Mono Vault tube, designed for this very purpose.

The Mono Vault Features:

 

·         Heavy-duty construction tested and designed to be buried, with guns inside!

·         Air-tight seal

·         Two Lids- an inner lid with waterproof gasket and an outer ‘Burial Shield’ lid

Make sure to dip your firearms in some type of grease or cosmoline for long term storage, or invest in some Vapor Corrosion Inhibiting bags (aka VCI bags) to prevent rust and corrosion.

If you are concerned enough to bury some of your essentials firearms, make sure to take extra precautions for every part of this project.

Keep some gear in a location away from your residence for safe keeping. When you are ready to stash this gear or supplies then you need to consider making a Survival Supply Caches, the Prepper’s Safe Deposit Box!

Which Bug-Out Region Do You Live In?

The feasibility of any bug out plan depends a lot on your starting point.  Obviously, some regions of the country have more to offer than others in terms of places to go.  But every part of the Lower 48 has its share of potential bug out locations.  The map below shows eight major regions as I’ve divided them for the purposes of my book: Bug Out: The Complete Plan for Escaping a Catastrophic Disaster Before It’s Too Late.

The feasibility of any bug out plan depends a lot on your starting point.  Obviously, some regions of the country have more to offer than others in terms of places to go.  But every part of the Lower 48 has its share of potential bug out locations.  The map below shows eight major regions as I’ve divided them for the purposes of my book: Bug Out: The Complete Plan for Escaping a Catastrophic Disaster Before It’s Too Late.

There is some crossover between the regions shown here, but the illustrator has done a pretty good job of placing the demarcation lines approximately the way I have divided the bug out locations described in the book.  Note the page numbers that will correspond to the beginning of each regional chapter.  The first four chapters are on general information and planning, including gear and methods of transportation.

My reasoning for these divisions is that these specific regions offer distinct variations in terrain, climate and plant and animal communities.  Again, there is some crossover in some areas, but anyone familiar with all these areas of the U.S. will see how survival skills and gear can be different from one region to the next.  Natural hazards including everything from weather to dangerous wildlife vary according to these regions, as do resources such as the availability or lack or water, edible plants and game animals.  It is this variation that made working on this book such an interesting project for me over the past several months, not to mention the real time I’ve spent out there backpacking, canoeing and kayaking in all of these regions at various times during the past 25 years.  Writing each chapter made me reminiscence about past trips and long to load up a canoe or backpack and go again. 

My home base is in the Gulf Coast region, and I stay here because of family ties as well as my love of the water – both the rivers and the Gulf itself.  I’m lucky to have a large number of bug out options close by because I live in one of the least populated states east of the Mississippi River.  Those of us living in small towns or rural areas are the least likely to need to bug out to begin with, but each region on the above map has its share of densely populated cities where the residents would do well to have a working knowledge of where to go if the SHTF and they have to get out.  Keep in mind that the vast majority of the populations of those cities are not going to have this knowledge and most will not even try to leave, but will instead wait for outside help that may or may not come.  Out here in the small towns and rural areas of America, most of us would pull together in such a situation and help each other out, as has been proven time and time again when the big Gulf hurricanes have hit the nearby coast.  In the aftermath of Katrina, the media covered the chaos and violence going down in New Orleans, while people along the even harder hit Mississippi Coast quietly rolled up their sleeves and went to work digging out of the rubble and rebuilding. 

So it’s obvious that where you live has a lot to do with how you should formulate your survival plans and can be a big factor in your chances of success or at least the degree of difficulty you would face.  But one thing we are blessed with here in the U.S. is plenty of undeveloped and uninhabited lands.  It may not seem so when you’re driving past mile after mile of strip malls and suburban sprawl, but compared to so many other countries in the world there is a lot of unused land here – both public and private.  Have you explored all the potential bug out locations near you?  What if you travel a lot for your job or for pleasure?  Do you know where the big uninhabited areas are in other regions you frequent?  If not, you should think about it.  I hope that this kind of information detailed in my new book will be of use not only for bug out planning, but to encourage readers to get out and explore the great wild places available their own region and other parts of the country.  

Sample Bug Out Bag Checklist

Note: This checklist includes the items I would take in a bug-out situation in which I had to head out into the wilds of the Lower 48 States on foot. Using a vehicle, boat, or other means of carrying gear would allow much more flexibility. This list will need to be adjusted for high elevations or northern winters. 

BUG OUT BAG AND CLOTHING:

Kelty internal frame backpack
Jansport fanny pack (for critical survival items)
Lightweight mesh bag (for wild food gathering, carrying)
Leather and Goretex waterproof hiking boots (will be wearing)
Neoprene river shoes with heavy-duty hiking soles
Moisture-wicking inner socks (2-pair) (will be wearing additional pair)
Wool outer socks (2-pair) (will be wearing additional pair)
Wool watch cap
Boonie hat or Tilley sun hat (will be wearing)
Bandanas (3)
Ripstop BDU pants (2 pair) (will be wearing one pair)
Synthetic long underwear (2 pair)
Goretex rain pants
Heavy-duty belt
T-shirts (2) (will be wearing one under outer shirt)
Long underwear shirt (1)
Polar fleece long-sleeve (1)
Cotton-canvas long-sleeve (2) (will be wearing one)
Goretex parka
Camouflage poncho (doubles as small tarp, and useful to hide unattended gear)

SHELTER AND FIRE

Hennessey camping hammock 
550 paracord (100-feet)
Synthetic sleeping bag rated for the climate and season
Bic disposable butane lighters (6 or more)
Fire Steel Scout (2)
Fire Sticks (12-pack)
Small back of cotton balls soaked in Vaseline (tinder)

FOOD AND WATER

3-day supply of Mainstay or Datrex lifeboat rations, or MREs. 
1 gallon Ziplock bag of high-energy trail mix (dried fruits, nuts and seeds)
Power bars (half dozen)
Beef Jerky (several small packages)
1 gallon Ziplock bag of whole-grain oatmeal
Small quantity of Zatarains or Tony’s Cajun seasoning (renders anything edible)
One quart Nalgene bottles, pre-filled with drinking water (2 minimum)
Polar Pure Water Disinfectant (2 bottles)
Aquamira Frontier filter straw (1)

HUNTING AND FISHING:

Take-down .22 rifle 
.22 ammo (200 rounds minimum)
Ruger GP 100 .357 Magnum revolver (4-inch barrel)
Holster for revolver to carry in accessible location
Speed loaders for revolver
Winchester Trapper .357 Magnum carbine (optional, depending on situation)
.357 Magnum ammo (100 rounds)
Selection of assorted fishhooks for bream up to large catfish
Spool of monofilament line
Spool of trot line for drop hooks
Pre-made wire snares for small game

TOOLS:

Quality 18 to 24-inch machete with sheath
Cold Steel XL Voyager (5-inch folding Bowie)
Leatherman Wave multitool 
Small mill file
Diamond sharpener
Hand-bearing compass
Casio Pathfinder PAW 1500 watch with electronic compass
Topo-map enabled GPS receiver
Stainless steel 4-quart cooking pot (with lid, handle removed)
Stainless steel spoon
Sewing needles

MISCELLANEOUS: 

Map of bug out location and alternatives, laminated or sealed in Ziplock bag
Insect repellant with DEET
Small tube of SPF 50 sunblock
Sunglasses with retainer and case (if traveling by water or open country)
Heavy duty Dacron sailmaker’s thread (for sewing repairs)
Basic First Aid supplies, bandages and antibiotic ointment
Extractor Snakebite Kit
Cortisone cream (for poison ivy, etc.)
Benadryll (for bee and wasp stings)
Epipen (for severe allergic reactions to stings)
Imodium (Anti-diarrhea)
Ibuprofen pain capsules 
Field guide to edible plants (region-specific)
Passport/driver’s license
Cash plus gold or silver coins
Toothbrush
Small bottle of concentrated anti-bacterial soap
Small amount of tightly-packed toilet paper
Comb
L.E.D. version of the Mini Maglight, with extra AA batteries
(Or small L.E.D. headlamp that runs on AA or AAA batteries)
Small quantity of duct tape
Small bottle of gun oil/multipurpose oil

Sample Bug Out Bag Checklist

Note: This checklist includes the items I would take in a bug-out situation in which I had to head out into the wilds of the Lower 48 States on foot. Using a vehicle, boat, or other means of carrying gear would allow much more flexibility. This list will need to be adjusted for high elevations or northern winters. 

BUG OUT BAG AND CLOTHING:
 

bug-out-checklist

Note: This checklist includes the items I would take in a bug-out situation in which I had to head out into the wilds of the Lower 48 States on foot. Using a vehicle, boat, or other means of carrying gear would allow much more flexibility. This list will need to be adjusted for high elevations or northern winters. 

BUG OUT BAG AND CLOTHING:

Kelty internal frame backpack
Jansport fanny pack (for critical survival items)
Lightweight mesh bag (for wild food gathering, carrying)
Leather and Goretex waterproof hiking boots (will be wearing)
Neoprene river shoes with heavy-duty hiking soles
Moisture-wicking inner socks (2-pair) (will be wearing additional pair)
Wool outer socks (2-pair) (will be wearing additional pair)
Wool watch cap
Boonie hat or Tilley sun hat (will be wearing)
Bandanas (3)
Ripstop BDU pants (2 pair) (will be wearing one pair)
Synthetic long underwear (2 pair)
Goretex rain pants
Heavy-duty belt
T-shirts (2) (will be wearing one under outer shirt)
Long underwear shirt (1)
Polar fleece long-sleeve (1)
Cotton-canvas long-sleeve (2) (will be wearing one)
Goretex parka
Camouflage poncho (doubles as small tarp, and useful to hide unattended gear)

SHELTER AND FIRE

Hennessey camping hammock 
550 paracord (100-feet)
Synthetic sleeping bag rated for the climate and season
Bic disposable butane lighters (6 or more)
Fire Steel Scout (2)
Fire Sticks (12-pack)
Small back of cotton balls soaked in Vaseline (tinder)

FOOD AND WATER

3-day supply of Mainstay or Datrex lifeboat rations, or MREs. 
1 gallon Ziplock bag of high-energy trail mix (dried fruits, nuts and seeds)
Power bars (half dozen)
Beef Jerky (several small packages)
1 gallon Ziplock bag of whole-grain oatmeal
Small quantity of Zatarains or Tony’s Cajun seasoning (renders anything edible)
One quart Nalgene bottles, pre-filled with drinking water (2 minimum)
Polar Pure Water Disinfectant (2 bottles)
Aquamira Frontier filter straw (1)

HUNTING AND FISHING:

Take-down .22 rifle 
.22 ammo (200 rounds minimum)
Ruger GP 100 .357 Magnum revolver (4-inch barrel)
Holster for revolver to carry in accessible location
Speed loaders for revolver
Winchester Trapper .357 Magnum carbine (optional, depending on situation)
.357 Magnum ammo (100 rounds)
Selection of assorted fishhooks for bream up to large catfish
Spool of monofilament line
Spool of trot line for drop hooks
Pre-made wire snares for small game

TOOLS:

Quality 18 to 24-inch machete with sheath
Cold Steel XL Voyager (5-inch folding Bowie)
Leatherman Wave multitool 
Small mill file
Diamond sharpener
Hand-bearing compass
Casio Pathfinder PAW 1500 watch with electronic compass
Topo-map enabled GPS receiver
Stainless steel 4-quart cooking pot (with lid, handle removed)
Stainless steel spoon
Sewing needles

MISCELLANEOUS: 

Map of bug out location and alternatives, laminated or sealed in Ziplock bag
Insect repellant with DEET
Small tube of SPF 50 sunblock
Sunglasses with retainer and case (if traveling by water or open country)
Heavy duty Dacron sailmaker’s thread (for sewing repairs)
Basic First Aid supplies, bandages and antibiotic ointment
Extractor Snakebite Kit
Cortisone cream (for poison ivy, etc.)
Benadryll (for bee and wasp stings)
Epipen (for severe allergic reactions to stings)
Imodium (Anti-diarrhea)
Ibuprofen pain capsules 
Field guide to edible plants (region-specific)
Passport/driver’s license
Cash plus gold or silver coins
Toothbrush
Small bottle of concentrated anti-bacterial soap
Small amount of tightly-packed toilet paper
Comb
L.E.D. version of the Mini Maglight, with extra AA batteries
(Or small L.E.D. headlamp that runs on AA or AAA batteries)
Small quantity of duct tape
Small bottle of gun oil/multipurpose oil

DIY Solar Outdoor Shower

In some places, water heaters are outdoor bathrooms are considered more as luxury than a necessity. But that shouldn’t stop anyone from enjoying a warm shower!

Do you like the idea of outdoor showering? Then you will love this DIY shower.

do-it-yourself-shower

In some places, water heaters are outdoor bathrooms are considered more as luxury than a necessity. But that shouldn’t stop anyone from enjoying a warm shower!

This outdoor shower runs completely on solar energy, providing free hot water and lighting during the night. Reflective insulation and clear roofing are used to collect and store the heat from the sun. To improve hot water reserve, you can add a dual pane thermal glass cover.

This clever project definitely says that warm showers do not necessarily have to mean higher electricity bill! Could you use one in your yard?

Materials:

  • Cedar Wood Panels/Boards
  • Cement Foundation Blocks
  • Plywood
  • Water Tank
  • Fiberglass Batting
  • Bricks
  • Shower Fixtures
  • Solar Lighting
  • Reflective Insulation
  • UV Resistant Poly-type Clear Roofing
  • Deck Screws
  • Door Hinges
  • Hooks
  • Water Piping
  • Steel Support for solar box

Tools:

  • Table Saw
  • Hand Saw
  • Drill
  • Trowel
  • Shovel
  • Hammer

diy-shower

diy-shower2

diy-shower3

diy-shower4

diy-shower5

diy-shower6

diy-shower7

diy-shower8

diy-shower9

diy-shower10

diy-shower11

diy-shower12

diy-shower13

 

diy-shower14

diy-shower15

diy-shower16

diy-shower17

Best Bug Out Location

As the name implies this article is geared for finding the best bug out location. Should the need arise out of nowhere having an area in the back of your mind can really be a substantial benefit to getting out of the trouble quickly. Even if you do not have a location planned I will break down things that will be great indicators you have found a great bug out location.

bug-out-location

As the name implies this article is geared for finding the best bug out location. Should the need arise out of nowhere having an area in the back of your mind can really be a substantial benefit to getting out of the trouble quickly. Even if you do not have a location planned I will break down things that will be great indicators you have found a great bug out location.

Bug Out Shelter Plans

bug-out-location2

One of the most paramount needs is shelter. This will give you a place to rest and if built, or found if lucky enough to find a suitable shelter, a place to hide from whoever you do not want to come around your camp. If it comes to building a bug out shelter, especially a long life one, wood is going to be key. Most places across the United States have some degree of tree growth but obviously more would be better for concealment and availability of materials to build and fortify your shelter. A consideration to have is if there is a lack of trees bringing a canvas or tarp to make some type of shelter. Mainly in terms of your shelter getting something to keep elements whether it is sunshine or snow off of you is priority. Lean-to’s are simple and very functional quick shelter to build where wood is plentiful. If you are looking at this location as a long term survival area you can take more time in making the shelter more comfortable and stable and camouflaged.

If you have the foresight and the means to do so making a shelter beforehand and maintaining it will give you a great jump when troubles begin. This is the ideal situation because you can make it a far more functional shelter and up your chance of survival. A well built shelter can be upgraded in a variety of ways to take your from surviving to thriving. The first and major one is a source of electricity. A gasoline generator the newer developed inverter generator which offers the same benefits as a traditional generator but being more portable and much quieter. Solar panels are an even more long term feasible option. Set up correctly and with proper care offer great long lasting renewable energy without the need for fossil fuels and noise levels. Depending on your region will determine the effectiveness of solar panels. If the sun doesn’t cooperate in your region perhaps wind turbine are more practical for your region. With the advances in wind energy they now offer simple do it yourself kits to set up and provide electricity from the wind for reasonable costs.

Bug Out Water Source

bug-out-location3

Once you have an area that is suitable and advantageous for a durable shelter the next priority in the best bug out location is a bug out water source. Water is very important in a bug out and survival situation because as everyone knows you can’t go for very long without dehydration. The best bug out location would have some type of dependable water source nearby or easily accessible. Most water sources are not safe to drink from directly and will require some type of purification to make it drinkable. There are bug out bag take along options, previously described in the survival water purification article, such as purification tablets and boiling the water. These are great options especially if it is a temporary hold-up as any chemicals you bring to treat the water will eventually run out. Boiling is a great option and has been used throughout history. Typical water sources would be rivers, lakes, ponds, springs. All of these would be a great indication of a solid long term area to set up a bug out location.

There are also some great options for water filtration that you could procure if you have the location and shelter planned beforehand. They make some simple systems that do not use any electricity but still filter very efficiently. These systems depending on their size can treat thousands of gallons of water and is a great option for long term survival in one location.

Bug Out Food Supply

bug-out-location4

Finally after you have found your location and it is suitable for shelter and water the last primary consideration you need to look for is your bug out food supply. Most locations that suit the other two needs will lead to the possibility of food options for you as well. All sorts of vegetation is edible and getting an understanding of the plants in your area will give you an advantage if you ever need to delve into nature’s supermarket. Most edible plants do not need cooked and can be a good advantage if you are in a hurry and can allow you to eat as you forage. Some wild game will probably also be available to you in most locations. This could give you another great option for food if you learn how to hunt each type of game effectively. Insects can also be a good source of nutrition due to the amount of protein per ounce they possess. As mentioned before if the other two categories fit there is a better chance of finding food as well in the same area. Ensure you know what is edible and what is not especially in the plant kingdom.

Again if you have the means and foresight to stock up and prepare for a bug out situation  having seeds that you can plant if it is the right climate or season for it can be a great way to have a long term food source option. Another option is emergency food supplies. These MRE’s tend to have great shelf lives and are geared to giving you the nutrition you need while keeping the size of the stockpile to a minimum.

DIY Survival: Different Uses for Duct Tape

It’s common to hear someone joke about how useful duct tape is. In fact, it’s so common that there was even a DIY comedy TV show about its many (interesting) uses called The Red Green Show. All joking aside, however, it turns out that duct tape is actually quite a useful tool to have around if you don’t have anything else readily available. We’re going to tackle just a few of its uses here today:

uses-for-duck-tape

It’s common to hear someone joke about how useful duct tape is. In fact, it’s so common that there was even a DIY comedy TV show about its many (interesting) uses called The Red Green Show. All joking aside, however, it turns out that duct tape is actually quite a useful tool to have around if you don’t have anything else readily available. We’re going to tackle just a few of its uses here today:

Patches for Holes and Insulation

Whether you’re patching an Emergency Blanket or even a tent, you can utilize duct tape in small patching jobs. It can also be used as a sealant for holes in walls or as insulation in desperate times, particularly in the winter or spring. Tape over a small hole in your wall or even wrap duct tape around your shoes to form a barrier from water and provide extra insulation. For buckets, plates, bowls, or cups, you can use duct tape to patch any cracks or holes. Finally, if you use a flotation device or a boat, you can use it to patch holes and make it water tight.

Ropes or Chords

Let’s face it, sometimes Murphy’s Law happens, and when it does, you could be stuck without a rope for your tent or with a broken net. Not to worry, as you can use twisted duct tape to form a rope or a cord in desperate times. You won’t be able to use it for any major jobs like pulling a truck (not that we’ve tried), but you’ll be able to use it for small to medium-sized jobs when a rope or a cord is needed but not available.

Makeshift Belt or a Strap

We’ve all been there: a belt or strap breaks without warning, and in times of disaster, it may not be as simple as running down to the hardware or clothing store for a replacement. Duct tape can be utilized in lieu of a belt or strap in times of need.

Weapons and Tools

Anyone who’s ever done some yard work knows that handles — like those found on shovels — aren’t always skin-friendly when working for long periods. You can use duct tape to patch a pair of gloves, or even wrap it around a shovel handle to decrease the chance that you’ll get blisters or other scratches or cuts. Which brings us to medical uses…

Medical Uses

Yes, duct tape can be used for medical reasons, too. In addition to making makeshift bandages that will pull hairs but will also stop bleeding, you can also use it for padding or as a splint or cast (or part of one) in a situation when you sprain or break a bone. If there are branches or sticks available, you can also wrap the duct tape around these and make yourself a walking stick to assist you with movement. There are a variety of other uses for medical reasons, but these are just a few to start.

Makeshift Shelter

There’s nothing worse than being caught in the rain, but if you have enough duct tape with you, you’re covered (literally). Using some sticks or twigs as a kind of frame and the duct tape to hold it all together and as insulation, you can build yourself a small makeshift shelter that’s just big enough for you to sleep in until the bad weather passes. Hopefully you’ll never be that far away from your tent or other shelter, but if there is such a time, you’ll be able to survive it.

For the Kids: Teaching Our Kids about EDC (Everday Carry)

Everyday Carry (EDC) items aren’t just for gun totin’ survivalists in hunting vests or massive utility belts (though I’m sure my kids would LOVE to wear a massive utility belt!); they are also for Moms and children. It’s also not what we carry in our purses, bags or backpacks, but those things that are actually on our bodies at all times once we leave the house. Yes, I do carry an everyday bag now that contains more items, but this is a focus on those important things that should always be on us.

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Everyday Carry (EDC) items aren’t just for gun totin’ survivalists in hunting vests or massive utility belts (though I’m sure my kids would LOVE to wear a massive utility belt!); they are also for Moms and children. It’s also not what we carry in our purses, bags or backpacks, but those things that are actually on our bodies at all times once we leave the house. Yes, I do carry an everyday bag now that contains more items, but this is a focus on those important things that should always be on us.

We’ve all heard the stories about little boys packing as much stuff as they can into their pockets, and then never emptying them out before those pants go into the wash. Frogs, crayons, hot wheels, rocks, slingshots, used airsoft BBs, etc. are common things that I found in my boys’ pockets. But what about those really important things that should be in their pockets all the time – as soon as they leave the house for anything more than checking the mailbox for mail.

While it’s a little harder for girls since they don’t always have pockets, you can train them about carrying a bag (though it’s not as effective as a habit as bags tend to be left often).

We started training our children, early on, that carrying specific emergency things and everyday items was extremely important. Here are a list of the things by age level. We stand at the door as we are getting ready to leave and load from our basket at the front entrance before we step a foot out the door.

Pre-K

  1. Wallet (always has $1 in it) + 2 quarters
  2. Comb
  3. Flashlight – both of our boys loved having flashlights as little guys, so we always let them tuck a tiny one in their pocket, both for play and for use.

Elementary

  1. Wallet (always has at least $5 in emergency cash tucked away, plus whatever amount we think they can safely carry from their stash) + 4 quarters
  2. Comb
  3. Flashlight – we always provided a tiny flashlight on a keychain
  4. Key – assuming that you give your child a house key
  5. Multi-tool – this is something specific to our family, but our older children carry a small multi-tool with them.
  6. Walkie-talkie – for neighborhood play, one of the children carries a walkie-talkie so that the group can get in contact with home. If they are going in different directions with plans, on carries a family cellphone.
  7. Compass – Not only is this education, it’s great fun for my youngest who loves finding the way to everywhere.
  8. Bandana

Middle School & High School

  1. Wallet (always has $20 emergency cash tucked away) plus their own money + change
  2. Comb
  3. Keys – (as they are older, the keychains have other little additions as the children prefer – small clippers, pry bars, etc.)
  4. Compass – this is attached to a jacket or backpack or keychain
  5. Flashlight – the children tend to carry a larger flashlight as they get older, but still compact,
  6. Pocket Knife – please be aware that carrying a pocket knife on most school campuses will result in immediate suspension or explusion. We homeschool, so it isn’t a factor for us.
  7. Multi-tool – if your multi-tool has a blade, you can forgo the knife. Ours carry both as their multi tool does not have a reliable blade. The oldest carries a larger knife than the younger does.
  8. Lighter or other fire starting implement
  9. Cell Phone – If they are going out without us, they get a cell phone to keep with them for emergencies (walkie talkies are kept for just neighborhood wanderings)
  10. Bandana

NOTES FOR GIRLS: We all know fashion can butt heads with preparedness, but consider not purchasing pants for girls that don’t have pockets (in the elementary+ years), adding a side pocket through a side seam to fuller skirts/dresses. At this point, a bag/purse/backpack bag is probably going to be necessary, as well, but know that those items can easily be lost if a bag is left behind or stolen.

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY NOTE: in all of our wallets is a print out that gives important contact information in case someone is lost, injured or in need of assistance. It contains basic phone number information & medically necessary information (blood type & allergies). We are also implementing an I.C.E. system on all of our cellphones with this same information.

TRAINING TIP: Early on we taught our children about the importance of carrying their wallets at all times – and focused right on their bottom line. If we went to the toy store, but they did not have their wallets, they were not able to buy a toy. We did not allow them to ‘borrow’ money from us to pay us back when they got home (unless the object was more than what we typically have them carry on a day to day basis, in which we do make arrangements for borrowing). This helped them remember to always grab that wallet when we’re going out – they never knew when they might need it!

Hiding Your Backup Supplies

Often there is so much to take in that if a disaster in our country actually took place, we really might overlook the reality of it all. Too many web sites make it appear as though all you need to focus on is stockpiling all your prepping supplies  in a corner in a basement. It is out-of-the-way and be kept in an organized manner. Got plenty of beans, rice, oats, so forth and so on. Hey I even got the tool to grind up the corn and wheat. Got a calculator to count up what food intake will be necessary. Give me a break.

hiding-supplies

Often there is so much to take in that if a disaster in our country actually took place, we really might overlook the reality of it all. Too many web sites make it appear as though all you need to focus on is stockpiling all your prepping supplies  in a corner in a basement. It is out-of-the-way and be kept in an organized manner. Got plenty of beans, rice, oats, so forth and so on. Hey I even got the tool to grind up the corn and wheat. Got a calculator to count up what food intake will be necessary. Give me a break.

I eat every day and don’t even think about what I need to maintain my body. I put it on the plate, mix it up, and down it goes. Instead of worrying about calories and protein, worry about variety. I have over sixty different meals that we can use and guess what, no burn out on what we will be eating. That simply means that I would only have to eat any one meal about five times a year. Breads, pasta, meats, juices, beans, rice, so forth and so on. The nutrition of a meal should change per meal so that we are taking in different amounts of calories, protein, vitamins, and other needed factors to maintain a well-balanced life style. Okay, enough said on that.

I am an old country boy who has had the worst of time and the best of time. However, I do know one thing that a lot of preppers believe that they can hold off any attack they might encounter. Wrong. Wrong, and double WRONG. It won’t happen. Regardless, one factor will still remain. No matter how well you think you are protected and barricade in, it will be overran. These people coming into your area are looking for a means to survive. They won’t care about you, your assets, or how well you believe you can hold them off. There isn’t a brick wall that I can’t get through. Vent pipes can be plugged. A home is just that. A home. Remember that many of these looters are people with skills. They just didn’t prepare. It is life or death to them. Oh, sure, you might take out a few, but you will be overtaken. Regardless, one factor still remains. Your supplies, food, water, and all that you have struggled to gather and maintain will be compromised.

My personal opinion lies with the concept that no matter how well your defense is, you will be over ran by looters, rioters, or whatever. Even if you were able to survive the first wave of attack, what makes one believe there won’t be another and another. If you are that determined to protect what you have, I as a looter, will use common sense and realize that you have something worth guarding. Now my determination will even be more stronger to get what you have. Spread the word and now the group has grown. You have something to offer my group so they will aid me in my venture to raid those home that are well guarded.

Those places that are barricaded will not hold up. Even if they have no other choice than to burn you out, you will get out. Groups will band together because they believe you have something to offer. Then it happens. You are overtaken by the sheer number of attackers. What now? Everything you had has been taken by the looters. Your food, your water, your tools, your seeds, your solar power equipment. Everything. It couldn’t happen but it did. We just didn’t look beyond the limit of our stronghold. So now you, if you are lucky, are placed into a bug out scenario. Now what? The entire nation is overrun with people looking to survive.

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Ammo Crate Utility Box with 7.25″ Deep, Large,
Dark Earth. With some care, this could make a great cache container.

There are over three hundred million people living here in the United States. Millions of people will be venturing out. Oh, sure, many will be dead by this point, but only those that were weak at the beginning. Again stay focused. There are plenty of redneck country folks that can survive longer that your typical run of the mill city folk. Oh yes and lets not forget about the cousin that lives about ten miles down the road. Getting there is one problem but after you get there, are you sure they have not already been compromised or what makes a person think that they won’t be later?

My neighborhood alone will be gone through several times. Other groups of looter will be forced to check out already looted areas simply because they won’t know what is there or what has been taken. They are looking for that ever so small morsel that may sustain them just a little longer. Folks, it is not going to be a bed of roses.

So what can we do? I, like many others am stocking up, however I am going to the point of hiding a large supply of the items needed underground now and in the future to survive. No, not in my back yard – my eggs are not in one basket. I am not going into detail about the process of hiding items underground nor am I going into how to prevent any form of damage to these items because search the web site and pick and choose.

Hiding your backup supplies

My largest focus on this article is the process of hiding your backup supplies. Some close. Some far away. But Hidden so that you can find your supplies later and use them for survival. What may work for one person may not work for another, but the main concept is to hide a supply just as big as what you may have on hand.

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Mono Vault 107, Black, Dry Box Cache Tube, 10.5″ diameter x 7″ high

There are many sites that give good sound advice but the most dangerous part of surviving will be in the first month on and up to I would think somewhere in the time frame of six months. Now don’t get me wrong, that does not mean that I or my family will be living in the wilderness. Could be the case don’t know, but hopefully we will be able to return back to our home regardless of the damage that may occur. All is gone but guess what? All I need is a shovel and I am back in business. We will have to keep a lookout for the next group but at least we have shelter and food to maintain our survival. Just something to think about. The longer you are able to survive could make things easier due to the fact that as time passes, more of the threat will be gone. At some point, your life will be to adjust to replenishing your supplies not protecting them.Don’t limit or for even one moment think that you have all the answers. Be prepared and hide.


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Mono Vault 107, Black, Dry Box Cache Tube, 10.5″ diameter x 7″ high

If fact, if you have not planned for after a year down the road, you may not even survive then. Food, supplies, tools, clothing, and the list goes on will be needed to continue your survival. Do you have back up electrical or solar power hidden? Remember you lost all you had. Do you have a back up location for your hunting gear, your planting needs, your canning needs, your heating supplies. Bury and bury and bury. You don’t have to bury deep. Just deep enough to maintain a good temperature that can be maintained and keeps your supplies dry for an undetermined about of time. Most of all hiding in places that will not be found. Off the trail and in well hidden areas camouflaged to look just like the surroundings. In other words don’t place a sign above it and tell they world there is something there. Make sure the top can withstand a good amount of weight. Cover well and the ground cover must be blended into what already exists. It will be a lot of work. Sure will be, but just add up all the time that you put into what you don’t have now.

I like everyone else don’t have all the answers. Anyone who thinks they do, will be the first to go. No one really can tell it what it is going to be like before, during, and after such an event, but we who are preparing need to take in account the “what if” train of thought. The law of “if it can go wrong, it will”, will be the largest factor we will all have to face. Give yourself the flexibility to survive from different routes.

This article is not complete by any means. It was written just to throw out another view to aid others in planning about their survival. A well planned program can go up into smoke. If you plant a garden, do you plant just one stalk of corn? One tomato plant? One carrot? Why not? Same applies to idea of prepping. If you are not overtaken at the beginning of such an event, then guess what, you now have twice as much to survive on. That sounds great, but the question still comes into play. What if you don’t?

HIDE, HIDE, HIDE.

Portable soup

Reblogged from:  http://stoneaxeherbals.blogspot.com/2016/01/how-to-make-simple-nourishing-bone-broth.html

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FLEX-GRUB SUSTAIN EMERGENCY MEALS

Our ancestors have been making instant, travel ready meals in various forms from jerky or pemmican to powdered grains and vegetables for thousands of years. In the last 500 or so years portable soup, known previously as “veal glew”, “cake soup”, “broth cakes”, “solid soop”, “portmanteau pottage”, “pocket soup”, “carry soup”, “soop always in readiness”, and “glue-broth”, has been gaining popularity. The modern equivalent, bouillon, while flavorful, is a far cry from the life sustaining and convenient portable soup of yore. Traditionally, it is made from bone broth boiled down until thick and gelatinous and then dehydrated. To make your own portable soup, see the recipe I provided in yesterday’s post “How to Make Simple Nourishing Bone Broth”. You can also learn about why bone broth is amazingly healthy and why I love it here.

While some valued portable soup for its flavor, the vast majority preferred it for its high nutrient value, lightweight nature, and convenience of cooking. And who can disagree when 1/2 cup of it weighs just a couple of oz and makes over a gallon of bone broth in just minutes? In the 17th- 19th centuries portable soup was highly popular among soldiers, travelers, explorers of distant lands, woodsmen, housewives, and sailors. So popular in fact that many famous explorers brought large quantities of it with them. In 1804 Lewis and Clark went over budget to spend $189.50 for 193 lbs of the stuff, more than they spent on instruments, arms, or ammunition. Captain Cook brought 1,000 lbs of it on the Endeavor for his 1772 voyage to Australia. He was said to be a fan because they “enable us to make several nourishing and wholesome messes and was the means of making the people eat a greater quantity of vegetables than they would otherwise have done”. Although, the people apparently  did not like eating their vegetables because it is reported that Cook flogged any who refused to eat it.
William Byrd II, the founder of Richmond, Virginia, described it as “a wholesome kind of food, of very small weight, and very great nourishment, that will secure them from starving, in case they should be so unlucky as to meet with no game” and suggested that “should you be fainting with fasting or fatigue, let a small piece of this glue melt in your mouth, and you will find yourself surprisingly refreshed”. Even the Scottish poet Robert Burns describes hunters carrying portable soup in their packs.

Portable soup was not just for wars and expeditions, though, it was also a common household staple, prized for its convenience, ease of preservation, and its ability to nourish the ailing. From the 1694 book recipe “To Make Veal Glue” from The Receipt Book of Mrs Anne Blencow to Hannah Glasse’s 1747 cookbook The Art of Cookery Plain and Easy to the 1743 Lady’s Companion, portable soup was featured in many cookbooks of the era. In 1837 Eliza Leslie advised in her Directions for Cookery, “If you have any friends going the overland journey to the Pacific, a box of portable soup may be the most useful present to them”.

Portable soup became commercially available in 1840 when Justus von Leibig, a german chemist, developed “beef extract” to feed the “craving multitudes”. Spoiler alert, like a beauty pageant queen von Leibig did not solve wold hunger. Von Leibig did feed Henry Morton Stanley on his search through Africa for Dr. David Livingstone, nourished arctic explores such as Nansen, Amundsen, Shackleton, and Scott, and fed Allied soldiers during WWI. It was later marketed to housewives as Oxo.

Although portable soup has sadly morphed into the artificial, MSG filled bouillon of today, the good news is that you can make it yourself with a couple pounds of bones and a lot of time. You can dissolve a teaspoon in a cup of boiling water for a quick snack, use as broth in soup, beans, or rice, add to salads instead of bacon bits, or mix in with pasta or fried rice for an extra kick of flavor and nutrients. Again, you can see how I made portable soup in yesterday’s post “How to Make Simple Nourishing Bone Broth”.
For over 300 more pages on bone broth and portable soup, I highly recommend that you check out Sally Fallon’s new bookNourishing Broth: An Old-Fashioned Remedy for the Modern World (not a sponsor, I just love this book so much).

This much portable soup will make a gallon of bone broth!!

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Information for this post from:
– Nourishing Broth: An Old-Fashioned Remedy for the Modern World by Sally Fallon Morell and Kaayla T. Daniel
-National Geographic: http://theplate.nationalgeographic.com/2014/09/25/the-luke-warm-gluey-history-of-portable-soup/
– Jas. Townsend and Son, Inc. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fE5KzvOZRk

Disclaimer: This blog is just my own opinion, nothing more. While I try my hardest, everything may not be completly accurate or complete. Sorry, I’m only human, so do not hold me accountable for anything you do to harm yourself or the world around you. I do make money from this blog (seriously not very much at all guys). If you click on any of the links in my blog I may make money from it. I’m not sponsored by any of these people I just honestly love these products and want to give you the resources to find them.