Bowfishing for Survival

Bowfishing for Survival

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Planning to bug out along the waterways, rivers, or coastal areas?

Great! You’re in the right hands.

In this post, I’ll teach you a new skill (and an effective way of gathering food while out there) – bowfishing for survival.

Also referred to as archery fishing, this practice involves using your bow to catch the fish. And you can easily do it in shallow water or from your little boat- making it one of the most flexible adventures on planet Earth.

Sounds interesting, right?

You’ll discover even more exciting details as you read our full bowfishing guide which I’ll walk you through in a few moments…

 

WAIT…if you think that archery fishing isn’t practical or you can’t do it, just think of the Indians who reside by the Amazon River and rely on bowfishing to catch their daily bread.

 

Bowfishing for Survival – How To Catch Fish With Your Bow:

 

Arm Yourself With the Right Bowfishing Equipment

Just like any other job, bowfishing requires you to equip yourself with the right equipment.

If you’re a serious hunter, I believe that you have most of these tools, so you’ll just need to pack them into your backpack and head to the waters.

If you don’t have them, don’t worry. You can get them anytime you want…they’re readily available on the market at reasonable prices.

These equipment include:

– A bow: yes, this is bowfishing, and you’ll need a bow to make it work. But which bow should you use? I’d suggest that you go for the compound or recurve bows. Clearly, these will give you the best results.

Both bows share a number of aspects and will offer sufficient drive force to send an arrow right into the heart of the fish…plus they consume less space in your boat.

– You’ll need a set of arrows in your bowfishing endeavors. But don’t make the mistake of picking just any other type of arrow. The perfect set should comprise of arrow made using light wood or fiberglass material. They should also have a sharp pointer that easily pierces through the fish.

– Hey, you’ll also need some bowfishing reel…and I mean the best bowfishing reel, not any reel.

(Optional, depending on the fishing situation) bowfishing gear includes gloves, rubber hip waders, and sunglasses with polarized lenses.

 

I assume you’ve the above “tools of work” with you right now, right?

Let the fun begin!!

 

#1. Pick a suitable water body

Choose a water body that will enable you to catch fish and give you the desired results easily. If you prefer a shallow after body, be sure to fish around your target fish- particularly close to the grasses and weeds that provide cover. And, of course, make sure the environment is clean so that you can see beneath the water surface.

Typically, you should be within a range of 3-4.6 meters (10-15feet) from the fish you wish to bow down. Ensure you don’t cast a shadow over the fish as this might spook and frustrate your bowfishing efforts.

Also, consider approaching your target from the upwind location.

 

#2. AIM your Target fish

Get ready for the most important step of bowfishing- aiming your target.

“How exactly do I do that?”

Are you wondering already?

Well, all you have to do is point your bow at the target fish and shoot it…nothing new

But there’s one trick you need to learn to correctly shoot that fish you’re targeting:

That is, how to point your bow at the fish you wish to catch. See, the light traveling from one medium to next (air to water in this case) results in refractions. Thus, you’ll see the refracted image (the apparent fish) of the fish you’re targeting more clearly on the water surface.

And if you point at the apparent fish, your arrow might go high, and you’ll perfectly miss your target!

Many bow fishers have learned this lesson the hard way, and if you ask them, they’ll all give you this piece of advice:

Point your bow as low as possible!

 

#3. Don’t Forget this Important Bowfishing RULE:

What if the fish appears in a different location? For instance, let’s say the fish appears about 6m (20 feet) away and 60cm (2feet) underneath the water surface. In such scenario, it means the location has doubled…If it appears about 3m (10 feet) away and 30cm (1foot) underneath the water surface, then you MUST point your bow 10cm (4 inches) low.

…and you’ll have to double the 10cm as well. In other words, you’ll have to point 20cm (8inches) low.

It’s that simple!

If you utilize this 10-4 rule in all your bowfishing practices, I can guarantee you that you’ll bag more fish than you can imagine.

 

#4. Time To Make That Shot!

Congrats! You’re on the last step to catching your target fish with your bow.

But there’s a real problem here:

You have to hit your target such that it dies right away…and that means that you’ve to target the first half part of the body of the fish. Needless to explain, this section contains many vital organs such as the brain, meaning you’ll kill it on the spot.

We all know that fish can swim really FAST in water. So, you don’t have much time between pointing and shooting. I believe that your archery experience has taught you speed and accuracy which you’ll need to apply here.

What if you’re targeting the bigger fish- like alligator?

You’ll need to shoot them at least twice so that you can strike them down.

After a lucky shot, pull in the line quickly. You’ll be surprised at how easy it is to catch fishes at a single stroke with bowfishing!

 

Wrap UP

I told you bowfishing isn’t that hard! After reading through the above guide, I believe you can catch some fish with only your bow and arrows.

This is a fun-filled practice that does take you no time to perfect it. With the right archery equipment and our expert guide above, you’ll be awed by how easy it is to catch fish!

Free Educational Survival Classes – Come and get educated! Plan, Prepare, Protect!

Summer Classes for 2017 – SHTFandGO

There are two classes that charge a small fee, but the rest are all free and provide great information for you!

Take advantage of this these free educational survival classes. Each of these instructors put a lot of work into these classes to provide for all of you! You never know what could happen, so don’t be the last person to be prepared!

You can get more information on each class by visiting our website and going to our events page or click on the link below.

Events

June 3rd – Conceal Carry Class with Chief Joseph Balog, Genoa City Police Department. Lunch is provided and a fee charge of $50.00. 9AM – 2PM.

June 10th – Be Prepared with Essential Oils – Know the basics with Laura Zielinski. FREE EVENT! 10AM-12PM

June 17th – Learn about Raising Rabbits with Mike France. FREE EVENT! 10AM-12PM.

July 1st – Wilderness First Aid with Nick of the Woods. FREE EVENT! 10AM

July 15th – Fire Starting Techniques with SHTFandGO. FREE EVENT! 10AM-12PM.

Juy 22nd – Building an Emergency Shelter with SHTFandGO. FREE EVENT! 10AM-12PM.

August 5th – DIY Survival Gear with Jim Cobb. A fee of $10.00. 10AM-12PM.

August 26th – How to Build Trap/Snare Class with SHTFandGO. FREE EVENT! 10AM-12PM.

How to Track and Avoid Dangerous Animals

how to avoid dangerous animals
By Jonathan Kilburn-April 16, 2017

One thing that puts a lot of people off from hiking is the unknown. Sometimes, that unknown becomes very commonplace. Most people, across the Continental United States, have seen a skunk, deer, moose, bear, or other animals in the wild.

In the Northeastern United States, seeing a deer on the side of the road is almost as common as the white lines themselves. When humans venture off into an animal’s territory, these commonplace sightings can become much more dangerous.

When I was a child, I would visit my grandparents in Wisconsin nearlyhand next to a grizzly bear footprint every summer. My cousins and I would go into the woods, hike, find new plants, bird watch, or even shoot guns. My grandmother used to always tell us to, ‘stay in sight of the cabin. I never understood why I needed to stay close to the cabin until I was about 12 years old. There were two girls, down the road from my grandparent’s cabin, that were attacked by a bear. Luckily, both of them survived with minor injuries, thanks to a passing motorist.

While walking through the woods, or walking down the road in a rural area, is not inherently dangerous it can become dangerous if we do not know how to read the signs of nature. Animals are great at marking their territories. While humans have marked their own territories with fences, buildings, and cut grass humans have forgotten how to recognize the subtleties of animal markings and occasionally walk into situations that they do not know how to get themselves out of.

While this guide may be helpful to some readers, we wish to express that the tools may differ from one geographical location to another. It may also differ from state to state, even if these states do border each other. The United States has such a wide range of diverse ecosystems, and the animal markings in these ecosystems may vary from location to location.

However, the same rule applies, no matter what area you find yourself. We wish to share information closely associated with what can be considered dangerous animals, such as Moose, Bear, Mountain Lions, Coyotes, Etc.

Identifying the Animal:

Droppings:

Knowing what wildlife is local may help to determine what kind of animal would readily be present. Don’t expect to find a polar bear in Arizona or an armadillo in Maine. Knowing the local wildlife is the first step necessary to avoiding them.

deer pellets on the groundOne of the best ways to track animals is not to actually follow the animal itself, but follow what they leave behind. That’s right, dung. Dung, scat, or droppings, can tell us what kind of animal has recently been in that area.

Once a dropping is located, the size is going to tell you how large of an animal it came from. As an example, deer tend to leave very small, round droppings. While they are small, they leave a lot of them. A bear will leave a fairly large dropping, similar to a human. On the opposite end, a mouse may leave a dropping roughly the size of a grain of rice.

Once we have an idea of how large the animal is noticing what it may contain also helps a tracker to understand what kind of animal left the dropping. A large dropping, containing bits of fur, would be a good indicator of a predator. Perhaps a Mountain Lion or Coyote is nearby. Bear and coyote dropping also commonly contain nuts and berries.

If an animal eats something, evidence of their diet will be in their droppings.

After size, and contents, we want to look at moisture. If a dropping is moist, wet, and looks fresh it probably is fresh. Dry, white (with some exceptions), and brittle droppings are the sign of an older dropping.

Recent weather plays a large role in determining the age of a dropping. Wet weather can make a dropping appear to be fresh, when it may be old. Additionally, as the weather starts to warm, a dropping that is thawing may also appear fresher than it may be.

The last thing we want to notice is location. Fox will leave their droppings on prominent objects to mark their territories. Deer will leave their dropping wherever they are walking. Feline species will try to cover their droppings. Dangerous animals will either leave their droppings in a very obvious place or try to hide it. Anything in the middle is relatively safe. The only

The only exception is when it looks similar to human droppings or has no real shape at all. These are generally a sign of bear droppings or a sick animal. Bear droppings hold little shape near the end of the summer to early fall, when they feed heavily on berries.

Tracks:

pocket guide to animal tracks
*source – http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dfg/dfw/wildlife/wildlife-facts-pubs/tracks-guide.pdf

Everyone has watched some kind of movie where there is an amazing tracker that looks down at the ground and says something like, “a cat came through here 13 minutes ago” and everyone around them gasps in awe of their skills. While Hollywood has made tracking an exaggeration, the fundamentals are the same. The more practice you have, the more likely you will be to spot tracks.

Dangerous animal tracks will be easier to spot than other animals. They are generally larger, deeper, and farther apart. Feline (cat) species do not show claw marks while ursine (bear), canine (dog), lupine (wolf), and vulpine (fox) track show a clear outline of their claws. Hoofed animals will have between 2 to 4 indentations in the soil, depending on the species. In general, hoofed animals are to be avoided but not considered as dangerous as other species.

Aging tracks is a bit more difficult than aging droppings. Tracks, depending on the soil, will exhibit different aging patterns. Tracks in the soft soil will be well defined, while in the hard soil they may be difficult to spot. All animals need water to drink, so it is very common to see many well-defined tracks near a stream or pond.

As the water starts to dry up, during the end of spring, the tracks will also dry and crack. When the entire outline of a track is brittle it is generally an older track. When the majority of the outline is well defined, the track can be assumed to be fresher. Lastly, as the wind blows, anything that falls into a track may stay there. The more debris inside a track, or footprint, the easier it is to assume the track is older.

Markings:

Every animal will mark territory in its own way. Beavers obviously

black bear marking territory on a tree
*source – https://www.bear.org/website/bear-pages/black-bear/black-bear-sign/56-marking-trees-and-poles.html

need to chew wood to build their homes and will make it obvious their home is nearby. Bear and animals with antlers will also rub against trees, especially near a water source. The markings on trees may look the same, for someone unfamiliar with the different patterns between beaver, bear, moose, and deer. It is always better to be safe and avoid a questionable area altogether. If avoiding a questionable area is not an option, try to imagine an animal rubbing against a tree. A beaver poses little threat to humans and will chew a tree. A bear uses a tree as a back scratcher and may rub the bark off of a tree in one, or more, areas.

Generally, bear marks on a tree are superficial unless the tree was starting to degrade. Deer and moose rub their antlers on trees, especially during molting/shedding season. They use this as a way to put their scent on the tree and rub their antlers off. While some antlered animals don’t shed their antlers they do molt. Elk, especially, have a thin layer over their antlers that peels off. Try to imagine an antlered animal rubbing against a tree. If an animal was rubbing antlers against a tree you will notice hoof marks near the base of the tree, if not an antler itself!

Deer have a natural way of marking where they have been through their resting periods. They lay down on leaves or grass, making the ground, and anything on top of it, flat. They also will urinate nearby, killing much of the surrounding grass. Moose, elk, etc are not much different. If it looks out of place, it probably is.

It’s best to avoid these animal bed, not just because of the animal but the parasites that may be close by. If you see dry, flat, dead grass it was probably a deer, elk, or moose.

Any time an animal walks it will naturally move the soil or vegetation surrounding them. Broken sticks, scattered leaves, holes in the ground, all of these are common indicators an animal has been nearby. While a deer bed will leave the area flat when deer and moose search for food they tend to turn the soil over to find bugs to eat.

Omnivores may also disrupt vegetation when they eat by remove berries, nuts, or leaves from the plant. Most animals are opportunistic eaters. The easier a food is to obtain the more likely a dangerous animal is nearby.

Avoidance:

Now that we know what we are looking for, to spot an animal, we now know how to avoid certain areas. Common sense is at play here. If someone sees any of these signs of a dangerous animal, though droppings, rubbings, overturned ground, and tracks they know to avoid those areas. Seeing each of those once is not necessarily bad. Animals move, they come and go.

The likelihood of being in an area with a dangerous animal is very slim. They will try to avoid human contact first. If a hiker sees similar droppings more than once they should change direction for a while. If they see

If they see three different signs of a dangerous animal (eg. Droppings, tracks, disrupted vegetation) they should quickly change direction. When someone is hiking and oblivious to these signs they are much more likely to encounter a dangerous animal.

Staying alert will always help someone avoid dangerous animals. Exhaustion, in survival situations, allows out mind to not see common signs of danger.

Practicing the skill of spotting indicators of animal activity will help hikers to train themselves to notice even the smallest changes. When a hiker can spot small indicators they are more likely to notice larger indicators, even when exhausted.

Keep your eyes moving. Watch the ground as you walk, but take some time to stop and scan your environment. Just because you haven’t seen any indicators of animal activity doesn’t mean they are not there.

It’s a good practice to stop every hundred steps, or so, just to look around. Not only does this allow you to see the beauty of nature, it will give you a chance to spot marked trees, animal presence, and indicators of animal activity farther away.

When you can stop and scan the area you may notice that you find indicators of animal activity may be parallel to you.

Conclusion:

While animal attacks may be rare they do happen. Thankfully, we have been given all the tools we need to avoid some of these most dangerous animals. Recognizing, and avoiding, animals may not be a natural skill but it is a necessary one for every hiker, hunter, and survivalist.

The only way to learn these skills is to practice them. So, get out there and enjoy nature!

Original Article Here

Chiappa X-Caliber Review

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When the X-Caliber arrived, I was excited about something so strange and potentially the perfect survival rifle, shotgun or what ever it actually is. the X-Caliber is in a class of it’s own so there aren’t really any comparisons to anything out there.  Any time I take the X-Caliber to the range, people wanted to shoot it. It is such a novelty that people love it and dislike it all at the same time.  It just looks odd.

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The X-Caliber is marketed as a survival rifle. The “gun” can shoot both .22LR and 12 gauge. With the addition of any of the eight barrel inserts that come with the gun, it can be made to shoot the following:

  • .380
  • 9 mm
  • 40 S&W
  • .45 ACP
  • .357 Magnum/.38 Special
  • .44 Magnum
  • .410/.45 LC
  • 20 Gauge

The idea is cool. It’s possible you could keep this gun in your BOB, grab some hard cast .44 Mag for the big critters, a box of .22 for the small critters, a handful of 2-3/4″ 12 gauge for the flying critters, and the barrel inserts to shoot anything else you find along the way.

The gun is not light.  It has some weight to it and isn’t the easiest to throw around, but that can be an attractive attribute when you do finally run out of ammunition, you can of course beat zombies to death. While the X-Caliber does in fact look futuristic it isn’t the easiest to hold, but for it’s versatility it seems to work, just not as well as a rifle or shot gun that only shoots one type of ammunition, but then again that’s the real benefit to the weapon.

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When you break open the breach the inserts don’t allow for quick extraction, simply because that would be nearly impossible.  You do need to extract the rounds manually.  I would recommend keeping your pocket knife or multitool handy to extract the rounds more easily.

Ok, the real question everyone wants to know, “How does it shoot?”  Well it shoots bullets and shot shells.  Just don’t expect the rifle to give you a 1/2″ group at a hundred yards.  It is a little rough on the shoulder when shooting 12 gauge, since there really isn’t much padding, but it does shoot adequately for what it’s designed for.  The shot shells have an effective range of 25-30 yards.  Much past that you may not get much lead on target.  As for the other calibers you won’t have much better accuracy.  the 22lr, once sighted in is much better, but then again at least you have a full length barrel.  It does take some getting used to and learning the idiosyncrasies.

Image result for chiappa x-caliber

I would recommend sighting in the 22lr barrel and the others should be fairly close, but when I say close, it’s a broad interpretation.  You’re not going to use this in a sniper situation. I could hit a target at 25 yards with any of the barrel inserts which would be fine for human-sized animals, but poor for small game.

 

For zombies or those pesky post apocalyptic human trash scum bags trying to take your seed storage, it could be useful. It would be useful if chiappa released a sight that could be adjusted, and locked for each caliber, but I doubt that’s in the production line. The best part about this rifle though, you can shoot whatever ammo is cheapest and most plentiful at that moment.

The rifle/shotgun has decent triggers.  Yes it has two.  The 22lr trigger is crisp and has about a 4 pound pull.  It breaks cleanly and feels really good.  the shotgun trigger has a little more pull at 5 pounds and doesn’t feel bad, but has a little more creep to the break point.

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The sights aren’t bad either.  The bright orange shows up well and easily allows you to find the target quickly.  I liked the sights a lot and adjustment are performed quickly.


Specifications: Chiappa Firearms X-Caliber 

  • Caliber(s): Many!
    • 12 gauge – 2¾” – 3”
    • 22LR
    • .380
    • 9 mm
    • 40 S&W
    • .45 ACP
    • .357 Magnum
    • .44 Magnum
    • .410/ 45 LC
    • 20 Gauge
  • Type: Over & Under combination shotgun/rimfire rifle
  • Action : Folding break open
  • Feeding : Single shot with extractors
  • Barrel : Steel
  • Trigger system : Double triggers
  • Front sight : Fixed fiber optic
  • Rear sight : M1 style adjustable elevation and windage
  • Safeties : Top tang manual
  • Finish : Matt black; steel and polypropylene foam stock
  • Price: $949 with adaptors

The design and look are utilitarian at best.  Here’s what we thought of the overall performance.  It works.  It definitely does everything a gun like this could possible do, but it just doesn’t do any of them extremely well. but then again, that’s not the purpose.  It is a gun that allows you to shoot multiple calibers,and it does.  It’s not a great shotgun, It’s not a great rifle, but it does allow you to shoot x-caliber of calibers, as the name implies.  If I was reviewing a dedicated shotgun or rifle I would give it a poor rating, but since it’s very unique, and does what it’s designed to do, I give it a good rating.  With the adaptors it’s about as accurate as a hand gun from the same distance, so I would say it’s performing as designed.  You’re not going to win a sharp shooting competition with it.

It has Picatinny rails on the top and sides which would allow you to mount all kinds of accessories, although if SHTF getting replacement batteries may become difficult.

 

Semi-Automatic BullMaster Air Rifle

HatsanUSA Announces Semi-Automatic BullMaster Air Rifle

HatsanUSA is launching its first-ever semi-automatic air rifle.

The airgun, named the BullMaster, is a new semi-auto Pre-Charged Pneumatic (PCP) air rifle with a bullpup design. It will be available in .177 and .22 calibers.

“Our customers have been asking us to release a semi-auto bullpup for quite some time and with the BullMaster, HatsanUSA is delivering in a big way,” said Blaine Manifold, President of HatsanUSA. “For us, the key feature is that the semi-auto action is gas operated, as opposed to electrical. This delivers greater reliability and longevity.”

The BullMaster features a detachable, rotary magazine (14-shot capacity for the .177, 12-shot capacity for .22) and each rifle ships with three magazines. Carrying slots have been built into the stock for storing spare magazines. A 500cc volume air bottle is mounted to the forearm of the rifle, and two air cylinders are included. The barrel is full shrouded, precision rifled and choked for optimal shot count.

The entire package ships with an MSRP of $1,399.99.

Features include:

• Genuine bullpup design, Semi-auto action pre-charged pneumatic (PCP) air rifle
• Available in .177 (4.5 mm), .22 (5.5 mm) caliber
• Max Muzzle Velocity for .22 caliber is 970 fps
• Max Muzzle Velocity for .177 caliber is 1050 fps
• Detachable 14-shot magazine in .177 (4.5mm) and 12-shot magazine in .22 (5.5mm)
• Fully shrouded, precision rifled and choked barrel for accuracy
• 500cc volume air bottle mounted in the forearm
• Includes 3 magazines
• Includes quick-fill nozzle
• Tactical style ambidextrous stock with thumbhole
• 2 spare magazine carrying slots in the stock
• Accessory Weaver-style rail beneath the forearm
• “EasyAdjust” Elevation Comb Stock
• Ventilated rubber butt pad
• Built-in pressure gauge to monitor the cylinder pressure
• Weaver-style rail for both 11 mm and 22 mm scope mounts
• Overall blued finish, black anodized receiver
• Patented anti-knock system prevents discharge when rifle is knocked or bounced
• Manual safety
• Black metal trigger
• Fitted sling swivels

For more information, go to HatsanUSA.com.