Scavenge After SHTF Where to Look and What to Get

There are many phases in a total collapse of society. In the earliest stages you will find that people are simply trying to figure it all out. In this phase people will likely still be civil with one another. There will still be resources around and people will be living off their own stores. This phase will end quickly and give way to the more dangerous parts of a collapse.

Eventually – and in a modern society it won’t be long – there will come a phase when most resources have been exhausted. You will still need resources to stay alive. At this point the scavengers will arise. If you haven’t prepared enough, or if unseen issues crop up, you might be a scavenger too.

The smart prepper will operate in a balanced world of simple, self sufficient living and scavenging practices.

HOME REPAIRS

Not only will your local Lowes or Home Depot be gone; it will be picked clean and likely taken up as a decent base of operations for some gang or military faction. Still, you will need a home that protects you from the elements, with a roof and walls that keep the wind and rain out. It’s vital to keep as much of your home in working order as possible. Consider scavenging things like:

  • Scrap Metal
  • Scrap Wood
  • Insulating Materials
  • Cloth
  • Gutters or Irrigation
  • Tools

MEDICINES AND FIRST AID

Did you know that every business with onsite employees is required to have access to a first aid kit? Even the small law firm down the street has a first aid kit. When it comes to scavenging these types of supplies you would do well to look at these small abandoned businesses and business parks. I think you will be pleasantly surprised with what can be found in the desk drawers of offices. In a true SHTF situation, even animal medicines may prove useful. Before considering any “alternative” medicine, be sure to research the heck out of it.

WEAPONS

Whether we are talking about bullets, guns, knives or even baseball bats, in a collapsed world where scavenging is necessary you will need to be able to protect yourself against various threats. The gun shop may not be the best stop to swing by on a scavenging jaunt, but what about the distribution center for a big box retailer that is far out in the country? A lot of firearms and ammunition get sent by mail in the USA, so when the crisis hits the chances are there will be weapons among the packages waiting to be delivered. It will be this type of thinking that makes scavenging profitable.

DIY

Scrap wood, metal, nails and other random bits and pieces will be crucial if you plan on DIYing yourself through the disaster. The good news about scavenging these items is that the disaster and the following collapse will likely leave plenty lying around to be scavenged.

Crumbling homes and buildings are likely to produce plenty materials to scavenge. You might still be in the market for things like nails. If you find yourself an abandoned pallet yard, you can build a whole house using the nails and wood you harvest from those pallets!

Smart Scavenging

There will be a certain amount of risk when you head out to scavenge. Where you go and when will determine the amount of risk you face. We will look at two ways that you can scavenge smarter. You must be willing to do a little research ahead of the collapse, and learn to operate at the best time for scavenging.  The items to bring with you is important. Tools, bags, cordage, liquid containers, duck tape, etc might all be very useful when scavenging. Especially if you hit the motherload. If you do hit the motherload, you may have to hide some of your booty to come back and get. Materials and tools for this would be handy.  You should also think about Scavenging in pairs. 1 as a watcher and one as a scavenger. Also, a very valuable skill would be sign language.

Location

Long before the scavenging begins you will want to make a resource map of your immediate area. These are simple to create. By printing an area map of your location and the surrounding areas (use google maps) you can mark all the major retailers and business parts in the immediate area. Color-coded markings and a key will help quickly identify things like medicine, food and tools. This resource map should focus less on the big retailers and more on small stores and business parks. Your scavenging success will come down to how few people you run into, so you want to stay away from obvious places that most people will search.

Stick to smaller business parks and offices for scavenging. Look also in abandoned homes that can be watched from afar. Valuable locations for various supplies could include feed stores, sale barns, and veterinary clinics. Tools, batteries, various fencing and repair items, and medicines and bandages can all be found there. These places may be picked clean early, but they may still be worthwhile for a scavenging trip. Also, feed stores may have batteries left for the poor man’s taser (cattle prod). Spend some time looking for the useful items: traps, rope, solar power, self-help books, etc.

Timing

Another very important factor in successful scavenging is when you decide to get out there and do it. Your goal should be to move when the least amount of people are around. The time between 3am and 6am is a great window to get things done. You have darkness for most of this time frame in most seasons. Those who stay up late will be sound asleep by this time.

When planning your trip be sure to calculate your round trip. Make sure that you have plenty of time to scavenge when you arrive at your location. Don’t blow an entire trip on travel time.

Places to Scavenge After SHTF:

  1. ABANDONED BUSINESS PARKS AND SMALL OFFICES
  2. DISTRIBUTION AND TRUCKING CENTERS
  3. JUNKYARDS
  4. USED CAR LOTS
  5. ABANDONED HOMES
  6. CELL TOWERS
  7. MARINAS
  8. MANUFACTURING CENTERS
  9. PERSONAL STORAGE FACILITIES
  10. ETC.

Can see the original at http://www.askaprepper.com and https://www.prepperwebsite.com

How to Prepare When You’re The Only One- Part 3, by Patriotman

I’m a man in his mid 20s trying to prepare for when SHTF to care for 21 family members and guide another 21, none of which are really contributing in any significant way. I’m also part of a fireteam group, but they are not walking the walk on preparations either. My girlfriend is supportive, but I feel generally alone in my preparations. I’ve outlined the problems I have in each group– family and fireteam– in Part 1 of this article series. In Part 2, I went over how I am resolving these problems and my specific plans as well as …

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How to Prepare When You’re The Only One- Part 2, by Patriotman

I’m a man in his mid 20s trying to prepare for when SHTF to care for 21 family members, none of which are really contributing in any significant way. I’m also part of a fireteam group, but they are not walking the walk on preparations either. My girlfriend is supportive, but I feel generally alone in my preparations. I’ve outlined the problems I have in each group– family and fireteam– in Part 1 of this article series. How Do You Overcome These Barriers to Success? Now that I have laid out my problems, which are substantial, I want to talk …

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How to Prepare When You’re The Only One- Part 1, by Patriotman

I think this article will resonate with many of the SurvivalBlog readership, because I suspect that many of us are in a similar situation of being the only one preparing. While some of you may be lucky to have complete buy-in and participation with prepping from your family or survival group, many others, like myself, may find that “the spirit is willing but the flesh is weak”. Before I speak about my experience with this issue and the steps I have taken to attempt to mitigate this, let me provide some background on myself as well as what the composition …

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Caring for Children on the Autism Spectrum During TEOTWAWKI- Part 2, by Grey Woman

The focus of this article is on prepping for children and adolescents on the mid to lower functioning end of the autism spectrum. If you are the parent or caretaker of an autistic child, I’m sure you have already considered your child’s or adolescent’s special needs and planned accordingly. This article is intended to serve as a general overview and resource for those who are less familiar with the needs and capabilities of these unique individuals. Autism- A Prevalent Disorder Based on the prevalence of Autism spectrum disorder and autism, it is likely that either your family or a family …

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Caring for Children on the Autism Spectrum During TEOTWAWKI- Part 1, by Grey Woman

“How a society treats its most vulnerable is always the measure of its humanity.” Ambassador Matthew Rycroft A fair amount of literature has been devoted to prepping for the needs of babies and children in general and for the elderly, but there seems to be far less information available to guide decision making in prepping for the developmentally disabled members, including those on the autism spectrum, of our communities. According to the latest analysis by the CDC, between 6% and 7% of children between the ages of 3 and 17 have been diagnosed as having a developmental disability. These disabilities …

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Disaster preparedness for families with food allergies

When you are the parent of a child with a food allergy, you have additional obstacles and things to consider when trying to be prepared. There could be circumstances where you’re required to shelter-in-place in your home for an extended period of time, or even go to a public shelter. In the event of either of these scenarios the best thing you can do is be prepared, and prepare your family for what may happen. This preparedness and training can be really beneficial for your children whether it’s a major disaster or a small house fire.

Create a Family Disaster Plan

The first step to getting ready for any sort of disaster or emergency situation is creating a family plan. In addition, depending upon the age of your child and the size of your family, you’re going to have to make adjustments to your plan. For example, if you have an infant your child isn’t going to be able to do much for themselves, and if you have an older child they may be able to help out more. Additionally, you have to keep in mind that your child and you may not be in the same place during a disaster, so you have to figure out how you will reach each other and meet.

  • Decide on a location of where to meet in your home if there is a disaster
  • Practice emergency drills for if there’s a disaster in your home
  • Fill out a Family Communication Plan for your child and put it in their go-bag, make sure they know and understand the plan (depending on their age). Be sure to fill this out together and talk through this plan together.
  • Talk to your child about the disaster plan if they are at school or day care

 

Connect with your child’s school or daycare

If your child is at school you’re going to want to 1) talk to the school about their emergency plans, and 2) figure out what supplies and emergency kit you’re going to leave for your child at school. I think it’s critical to explain to your child what will happen and where you will be during this time.

Things to consider about your child’s daycare or school:

  • Do they store water and food?
  • Do teachers have first aid and CPR training?
  • Can children leave and store their own emergency kits?
  • What is the plan if the class doesn’t shelter-in-place and they have to go somewhere else?

When you’re packing an emergency kit for your child at daycare and school, here are some things I would consider:

  • A comfort item like a teddy bear or toy that makes them feel secure
  • A folder containing medical information, family contact info, and any other contact numbers
  • A change of clothes
  • A supply of medications – both prescription and over-the-counter
  • A family photo including a note from parents or recorded message
  • An emergency whistle
  • A water bottle with water emergency pouches
  • A small flashlight
  • Basic first aid supplies
  • Epi-Pen/Auvi-Q and carrying case
  • Snacks appropriate to their diet
  • Handwipes
  • An emergency ID card – in addition to their allergy bracelet. These ones come in a variety of patterns and styles and you can include your contact information on the back.

 

Your Home Emergency Kit

It’s important to have a home emergency kit stocked with everything your family could need. I highly suggest having extra food for your child with food allergies. During a stressful situation, you don’t want to be forced to introduce new foods, so pack long-term emergency food and extra of it. Don’t forget to re-stock and check your home emergency kit regularly.

Here are some suggestions of item’s for your home emergency kit:

  • Water for each person in the house-hold (enough for drinking and cleaning)
  • A first aid kit
  • Contact information for relatives, hospitals and emergency shelters
  • Medical information on everyone in the family
  • A detailed allergy plan
  • Food supplies suitable for your child with food allergies
  • Prescription and over the counter medications
  • Flashlights
  • Extra batteries for all devices
  • Emergency blankets
  • Maps of your local area
  • Copies of any personal documents including birth certificates, insurance and passports
  • Sanitation and personal hygiene items
  • A battery-powered radio
  • Extra cash
  • Pet supplies
  • Games and activities for children

One easy thing is to

Suggestions for foods to have on hand

You’re going to need food that is not perishable and can store for a longer term that works for your child, here are some suggestions:

  • Soy, Almond, Coconut Milk and other non-dairy milks that don’t need refridgeration
  • Peanut-Free nut butters like SunButter
  • PackIt Gourmet has both dairy-free and gluten free meals that can be used in long term storage.
  • Mountain House has a variety of dehydrated gluten free meals
  • Some of the Paleo Meals to Go may work for your child

 

Your child’s home bug-out bag

In addition to having an emergency kit for your house your child should have a home bug out kit in the form of a backpack or easy carrying case. You’ll want to check bags on a regular basis to make sure everything in them is re-stocked and up to date. Things to include here are:

  • Re-usable water bottle
  • Change of clothes
  • Comfortable shoes and socks
  • Medications
  • Family contact information and emergency numbers
  • Toiletries
  • An emergency blanket
  • Small snacks
  • Emergency whistle
  • Hand  sanitizers
  • Band aids and wipes

You can also pick up a pre-made kit like the one below and then add additional items that your child may need.

A Few Hard-Learned Lessons- Part 2, by Grey Woman

I am continuing to share some of my hard-learned lessons as a single woman who moved out into the country. My story and lessons that follow, provided in no particular order, might save you money, time, injury, and humiliation as you make this journey towards self-sufficiency and preparedness. Yesterday, the lessons were on chainsaw, firewood, and wood stoves. Bears, Birds and Bullets One part of moving out of the suburbs and into “the country” that I was really excited about was being more in touch with nature, especially birds. I have always loved watching wild birds and hearing them sing …

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A Few Hard-Learned Lessons- Part 1, by Grey Woman

I assure you that all of the following lessons are ones I have learned the hard way. I am sure that for those of you who grew up with a self-sufficient lifestyle or have been doing this for a while or even just possess a tiny bit more common sense than I do, this will be a good laugh. These are embarrassing but all 100% true. Feel free to chuckle, guffaw, head slap, ridicule, or otherwise enjoy my complete and utter loss of pride. I can take it, and I certainly deserve it. Sometimes even I wonder how I have …

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The Second Amendment, by D.V.

There is a lot of talk about the Second Amendment right now. The Bill of Rights is a document that has been enshrined in the annals of America. Ultimately, it is the fundamental rights that is provided to individuals to protect them from an overbearing government. While of the amendments on the Bill of Rights that are under attack, the amendment that takes the greatest beating is Amendment #2– the Right to Bear Arms. (I believe I could make valid arguments on all ten are under attack, yes even Amendment #3– No Quartering of Soldiers, but that is a different …

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Cipher Security- Part 2, by East Sierra Sage

I’m talking about cipher security. In review, I am a Retired Marine Infantry Staff Non-Commissioned Officer who has served multiple combat tours in Iraq, as well as most of the “skirmishes” the U.S. got involved in leading up to the global war on terror. I have taught “Survival in the Mountains” and have trained combat staff members in command post operations. I have taught Navy SEALS, Army Special Forces, Army Rangers, and Air Force Para-rescue operators, as well as many numerous foreign military personnel. During my career I was “voluntold” to write ground-up Intelligence reporting to higher headquarters. These tasks …

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Cipher Security- Part 1, by East Sierra Sage

[Editor’s Note: This is good information, but readers should note that simple transposition ciphers of any type can be easily broken. Only One Time Pads and book codes offer any reasonable level of cipher security.] My Nom de Plume is “East Sierra Sage”, and I’m writing about cipher security. I am a Retired Marine Infantry Staff Non-Commissioned Officer. I served multiple combat tours in Iraq, as well as most of the “skirmishes” the U.S. got involved in leading up to the global war on terror. Two tours were served as an instructor of Mountain Warfare training for the Marine Corps. …

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Perspectives on Patrolling- Part 5, by J.M.

Today is the final part of this article on patrolling in the post-SHTF scenario. If you just jumping in here and have missed the earlier parts, go back and look at what has been covered already, including objectives, planning, navigation, movement, contact, observing and more. Bivouacking Let’s look at the practical concerns of bivouacking within a patrol group. Even if everyone in the patrol is in perfect physical shape, you’ll still need to stop for food and rest occasionally. Since you will be walking a lot, you’ll be burning a lot of calories, which you’ll need to replace. Food is …

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Perspectives on Patrolling- Part 4, by J.M.

We are looking at patrolling in a post-SHTF scenario. In parts 1, 2 and 3, I reviewed the definition of “patrol” and objectives of patrolling as well as planning, dress and kit, navigation, movement, and now the subject of dealing with contacts while out on patrol. I have provided some pointers on handling contact situations, and there is still a considerable amount to cover on this subject. Let’s continue. Contact (continued) Document Each Contact Once the contact is complete and you’ve departed the immediate area, you should stop and document the contact while the information is still fresh. This should …

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Observations and Prepper Lessons From County Jail, by M.R.

I am a correctional deputy, who works in a rural county jail in a mid-sized state somewhere out west, with some observations to share with my prepper community. When I first went into the jail to work, I felt naked without my EDC– a pistol, knives, and multitool. Don’t fret; I have them safely stored in my private vehicle outside should the SHTF happen and I need to make the trek home. However, I like to use every opportunity to learn something new. Enlightened Observations of Communal, Cramped Living As I have been making my rounds, conducting shakedowns, and dealing …

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China’s Tiangong-1 space station could fall to Earth over Wisconsin next week

The space station was initially launched in September 2011. An official Chinese statement declared that Tiangong-1 terminated its data service on March 21, 2016. Since the Chinese government has lost control of the station, it’s hard to predict where and when it will fall.

China's Tiangong-1 space station
Copyright Getty Images: Provided by NASA

An update on the expected re-entry of China’s old Tiangong-1 space station has been announced.

The space station was initially launched in September 2011. An official Chinese statement declared that Tiangong-1 terminated its data service on March 21, 2016. Since the Chinese government has lost control of the station, it’s hard to predict where and when it will fall.

The European Space Agency predicts the space station will fall back to Earth between March 30 and April 6, while research organization Aerospace predicts a re-entry on April 1, give or take 4 days.

Aerospace says it is much easier to predict a re-entry time than a location. This explains the wide scope of possible re-entry zones, which both Aerospace and other organizations predict will be between 43 degrees North and 43 degrees South latitudes.

Southern Wisconsin is right on the edge of this span. While many scientists believe most of the object will burn up while entering the atmosphere, there is still a chance some debris makes its way all the way to the ground.

The odds that any debris from this station will hit one specific person are about one million times smaller than winning the Powerball lottery, according to Aerospace.

Out of all the space debris to have fallen into Earth’s atmosphere, it is believed that Lottie Williams is the only person to get hit directly. Fortunately, she survived.  …..Read Full Article

Perspectives on Patrolling- Part 3, by J.M.

We are looking at patrolling in a post-SHTF scenario. In parts 1 and 2, I reviewed the definition of “patrol” and objectives of patrolling as well as planning, dress and kit, and navigation. Now, let’s look at what the patrol does after it is dressed, fed, and in action. Movement When on patrol you’ll generally be doing one of three things– moving, observing or resting. The majority of your time being spent moving around, so it is essential to understand and practice movement techniques. Dimensions of Patrol Movement Two of the most important dimensions of patrol movement are being able …

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Perspectives on Patrolling- Part 2, by J.M.

We are looking at patrolling in a post-SHTF scenario. In part 1, I reviewed the definition of “patrol” and objectives of patrolling as well as planning, though we only concluded the portion about general operational planning. Let’s continue to discussing planning and move forward. Planning (continued) Mission planning is the planning performed for a specific patrol. This should include goals and objectives, route, timing/duration, rally points, communications, intelligence, weather, organization, rules of engagement, and load-out. Goals and Objectives What are the goals and objectives? Basically, what should the patrol accomplish? Both primary and secondary goals and objectives should be defined …

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Perspectives on Patrolling- Part 1, by J.M.

Patrolling is something you may need to know how to do. In today’s world, if we want to find out what’s going on around us, we typically turn to the Internet, look at TV or newspapers, or call up a friend. In a post-SHTF world, we probably won’t have those options, but we’ll have an even greater need to locate resources and stay up-to-date on what’s happening around us that might have an impact on our health, safety, or well-being. One way to accomplish would be patrolling. Patrolling Defined For the purpose of this discussion, I define patrolling as “a …

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No Man Is An Island, by J.S.

“No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent.” – John Donne Compared to the seasoned veterans of the preparedness camp, I am a rookie. I have no specific training in any field or category that would make me specifically qualified to write an article on preparedness, but that is why this is so important. Majority of Preparedness Individuals Are Not Specialists Odds are the vast majority of TEOTWAWKI preparedness-aware individuals are not specialists in any specific category of emergency or end of societal type skills. Yes, they have a few specific things …

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