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9 Ways to Remove a Splinter

how-to-remove-a-splinter

How to Remove a Splinter Naturally and Painlessly

Splinters can be hard and painful to remove. The most common first thought is “Where are the tweezers?”

how to remove a splinter

With tweezers, it can be a long process and can sometimes make the splinter go deeper into your skin. Here are 9 alternative ways to remove those pesky and often painful splinters.

Bacon Fat

bacon fat

Cut a pea-sized piece of white fat from a raw strip of bacon and place directly onto the splinter. Secure the bacon fat with a band-aid and leave on overnight. The bacon fat should draw out the splinter from your skin.

Hydrogen Peroxide

removing a splinter with hydrogen peroxide

Submerge the affected area in hydrogen peroxide. Splinter should get drawn out within minutes.

Onion

how to remove a splinter with onion

Tape a fresh onion slice onto the splinter and leave on overnight. The splinter will be drawn close to the surface of your skin and will be easy to remove.

Epsom Salt

how to remove a splinter with epsom salt

Soak the affected area in an epsom salt bath until the splinter gets drawn out.

Wide Mouth Bottle and Hot Water

how to remove a splinter with a wide mouth bottle and hot water

Fill bottle almost full with hot water. Place hand with splinter over the opening of the bottle so the opening of the bottle is completely covered. Steam and suction caused by your hand should draw out the splinter from your skin.

Clear Nail Polish

how to remove a splinter with clear nail polish

Apply clear nail polish over the affected area and let dry. Peel off in the opposite direction of the splinter. The splinter should come right out.

Essential Oils

how to remove a splinter with essential oil

Add a few drops of lavender or clove essential oil to the affected area. This allows the splintered skin to naturally swell. The splinter should come right out.

Castor Oil

how to remove a splinter with castor oil

Rub castor oil into the affected area. Cover with band-aid and leave on overnight. This softens the skin and the splinter should be easier to remove

Tomato

how to remove a splinter with tomato

Apply a small piece of tomato directly onto the splinter with a band-aid and leave on overnight. This should draw the splinter right out.

Linked from: http://survivallife.com/9-ways-to-remove-a-splinter/

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How to survive in the wilderness and mountain-military techniques

how-to-survive-3

Necessary elements of life

One of the most important things to survive is water.

The human body contains 70% water, and the loss of 15% of this amount causes death. Without water you can not survive more than 4-5 days, the body loses fluid due to heat, stress, colds and fatigue, fluid to be topped up. Even in cold places you need at least 2 liters of water a day to be effective. Almost anywhere in the globe there is water in one form or another (snow, ice, dew, etc.)

Do not substitute water with the following liquids:

Alcohol – dehydrate the body even more

Urine – contain substances hazardous to organisms

Blood – is salty and is considered food, but require additional liquid to be digestible, can transmit diseases

Seawater – accelerates dehydration, can cause death

There are many ways to acquire water (meaning the cases when there is a river, stream, lake or other natural source of water) depending on the city where you are in the wilderness act one way in jungle otherwise, etc. I will describe several methods of gaining water in forest areas or where there are trees.

Sweat method

You need a plastic bag that you dress a twig with leaves (make sure the tree is not poisonous otherwise water is not drinkable), the bag must be tightly tied with a rope or you around the branch, after several hours leaves sweat and water accumulates in bag.In  hot summer day you can gather up to 300-400 from a bag. You must to use your bags to accumulate the required amount of water

Dew gathering: early morning or late evening tie a piece of cloth clean on foot, walking or on a stick and walk through iarba. Cloth will gather water (dew) from grass, periodically drain into a bowl, certainly is the slowest way, but safe.

Food = ENERGY

30 days is the maximum period that can withstand a man without food.

In an extreme situation you will need every drop of energy, food being the only source. Natural resources can save in any case only have to know how to use them. I have several recommendations in this case, some more important than others but the main rule is:

Do not eat if you do not have WATER

how to survive 1

Human digestive organism needs water, if water is a problem eating you will become dehydrated and harder, which can cause death. Few are places on earth where you have to go more than 30 days without going to civilization .Calculate the distance and time to the place where you arrive, the food divided as follows: 1/3 2/3 in the first half and in the second half of the road.

Make a regular habit to eat every day  (lunch at noon ex.o), chew food well as the organisms they support it.

In the wild can eat what nature gives mushrooms, nuts, fruits, herbs and roots of edible plants, small animals or large (if you manage to catch them), fish, lizards, snakes, snails and will advise if you have insects. If you have not experienced hunter I will advise you not to try to catch animals, you spend useless energy.

Careful with mushrooms and fruits, if you are not sure do not eat, the result can be fatal.

Shelter

The shelter must protect you from rain, sun, wind, help to survive; -in some parts of the world you need to shelter more than food or water.

For example prolonged exposure to cold can cause fatigue or weakness and a weak person has no desire to survive.

The most common mistake in the construction of the shelter is that you do too much body heat and fails to heat it;

how to survive 2

Shelter should be large enough to protect you but also the need to be small enough to preserve your body heat, especially in cold climates.Different types of shelter after the place where you are for example, the arctic or desert, jungle or forest, every time you build something else.Different also the seasons, winter snow or summer heat are so many types of shelter types cite season.

The importance of fire. Types of fire. Methods and tools for fire ignition

Modern man does not like fire. Fire historically has become more of a tool than salvation.In dawn of human civilization killer fire was the most important thing in human life, loss of fire was a tragedy for the tribe and punishable with death who had to take care of the fire, and fail.

how to survive 3

The principle of ignition-fire is to start with small twigs and slender, gradually passing on higher. began ignite paper, dry bark, moss or fir branches on a short time they give a strong flame to ignite the branches of 3-5 mm thickness and then the thickest. The secret is to put the wood gradually from the smallest to the thickest. Paper or branches are lit from the bottom up, not vice versa, because fire spreads from the top down hard.

Fire with fire is used for drying clothes, heating and preparing food; the flame for light and food preparation and the smoke is used for signaling. Division is relative, you can turn any fire in fire smoke if you throw him green grass and branches, if a fire with embers increase the distance between him turn wood fire flame converts into large, etc.

Weapons

The knife is king arms without knife is no survival with a help of a good knife can do everything or almost everything, can build shelter, can make weapons, you can defend yourself or you can hunt without it you’re dead in the wild, so if you have not – the important thing to know how to do one of the materials that are found around you.

Glass, tins, hard stone, bone, pieces of metal – are all possible materials to your future personal knife. Personal I would not go anywhere without one in my pocket …

I could not tell you the exact name of it ideal knife, but there are a few requirements; a knife to be:

RESISTANT

BIG

SHARP

If you go into the mountains for a long time you need two knives. One to be great, the type layout, replacing the ax and one smaller for peeling potatoes, etc.

Each of survival as on the website or its praise his wares or merchandise company that has a contract to report. American and options in Bowie until you can tangle easily mock. A high price does not always look good quality. There are several criteria in choosing a knife: blade length, knife or blade stable miner, double tais or not, it is made of metal (steel, titanium, nonferrous metals, etc.)

how to survive 4

The knife that you take with you in the wild is the most priceless object that you possess. Regardless of the nature of the trip that you always need to have a knife on you. It can be used in different situations, not only in extreme situations.

Sun tracking, star tracking and compass tracking

The simplest way of finding the direction is sit back to 12 day in the sun, the north is exactly the direction that shows your shadow.

There are a few rules that must be remembered:

Winter sun rises southeast

SOUTHWEST sets in

Summer sun rises northeast

sets northwest

Spring sun rises at EST

sets in the west

Of course these rules are valid if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere.

If you have good sense of observation, then you know that: more snow melts in the south, all in the southern part of the tree is more pitch. Ants make their anthill in the south of trees or house. Birch bark is darker in the north and more open to the south. Tree trunks, stones, rocks in the north are covered with moss.

Survival in mountainous terrain

Survival in the mountains involves techniques and procedures characteristic.

Mount, as we know and the people, has its unwritten laws, which if not respect them, pay, and the price in such a situation can be even life.

Preparing to survive in the mountains must focus on that mountain environment is extremely unpredictable.Weather has special features: in a single day, the mountains may fall several types of precipitation (rain, drizzle, sleet, snow); temperatures are much lower and rainfall more abundant than in other areas; the higher the altitude, the colder temperatures. Therefore, when such actions envisaged in the village, the soldiers must have their protective equipment against the cold and rain, even if they are planned to take place in summer. An extremely important piece in the mountain environment is sleeping bag. A good sleeping bag will give the military the necessary comfort for rest and strength to take it to an end the next day. If there is a sleeping bag, it can be improvised from dry leaves, pine needles, Parachute material. survival are necessary: a waterproof jacket, a knife, matches kept in a bag not to wet a quality compass, a map, a flashlight, rations for emergencies and signaling means (mirror, smoke grenades etc. ).

Nature term is another important factor that influences the chances of survival of the military in the village. Large level differences, rugged terrain covered with dense vegetation, specific mountain environment, hinder much movement. Moving the mountain environment requires permanent existence of the risk of injury. Sprains, fractures, sprains could and limbs are the most common. Also, observation and orientation are more hampered. This could cause delays in movement military and fallacies. Lack of landmarks for orientation can cause frustration and irritation, and these negative feelings contributed to the worsening military situation. Therefore,  to survive in the mountain, the military must observe a few rules:

– “Equip yourself properly” in the mountains !: survival requires appropriate equipment;

– “Do not go in the dark” means !: If you do not have night vision do not move in the dark because it will increase the risk of injury;

– “You do not build shelter the valleys‘ !: As I mentioned, the weather in the mountain environment can change very quickly and after rainfall forming torrents may surprise you;

– “Moving up the line share ‘!: Try to stay on the same altitude to ease your moving.Any survival situation involving the purchase of food and water. Characteristic mountain environment temperate and tropical areas offer plenty of opportunities for procuring food and water. However, the military must be cautious when choosing a certain plant or animal to feed. Most nuisances disappear once boiling or cooking with their fire. However, there are no toxins that disappears with cooking (see mushrooms) and they can endanger the life and health of the military. A plant consumed by animals is not necessarily an indication that it would be edible and humans. To be sure food is edible, it should be cooked very well. Before you consume, the military must taste the food and wait a few minutes to see if any side effects, then you can proceed to power. Water is preferable to be boiled before being consumed.

Linked from: http://www.blacklistedprepper.com/survive-wilderness-mountain-military-techniques/

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How to Make A Tarp Tent with 25 Designs

Below I’ve listed 25 different tarp shelter designs to help you get started. Each configuration has its pros and cons and there isn’t really a perfect design for all occasions. You’ll have to chose the right one depending on your situation or you could just try them all out to test your bushcraft tarp setup skills.

25-tarp-shelter-designs-main

Gear You Will Need
gear-needed
  • A Tarp
  • Guy Ropes
  • Stakes
  • Hiking poles or tree branches
  • Plans on how to configure your tarp shelter

The size of your tarp and the number of attachment points or loops will effect what configurations you can make. Generally the more loops or attachment points you have on your tarp the better. The tarp I use is 360 x 280 cm and has 16 loops, however you can use larger or small tarps as well.

Most tarp shelters will have guy ropes included however if you don’t have any you can get them fairly cheaply. Most configurations need 3 or less guy ropes.

You’ll also need some stakes; as with the guy ropes most tarps will come with a set of these. These can be bought cheaply online or at a local shop. Generally you’ll want to have at least 4. If you don’t have any you can substitute metal stakes with sticks.

If you want to set up a shelter that requires trees in an area without them you can use poles or branches instead. Many people recommend trekking poles as the fit nicely to the tarps and work well in the snow. You also get these for around $15-20 online or at your local outdoors retailer. Most tarp shelter configurations will require 2 or more poles or trees to tie your guy ropes around.

If you wish to print these designs here is a PDF version.

Locations and Where to Set Up a Shelter

The location you chose and where you set up your shelter are important. You should study the weather in the area and choose a configuration that would best suit it. Ideally you should build on ground that slopes so if there is rain this is the direction the water will flow. If there are no slopes you should dig trenches to allow the water to flow off through them and away from you.

Ideally you will want to find flat ground without any rocks or objects that will make you uncomfortable to lay on.

Choose the right design depending on the activity. For example if you want an area for multiple people to eat or sit around the Dining fly is a good option. If you want to make a shelter for a hammock the diamond tarp setup would be best.

Tarp Shelter Plans With Instructions

1. Basic A Frame Tarp Shelter

A-Frame

The A-frame is a common tarp shelter configuration due its fairly simple design.

You’ll need to find an area with 2 trees around 10ft apart depending on the size of your tarp.

Tie 1 guy line around each tree roughly 4-5ft from the ground (depending on the size of the tarp). Make sure the line is tight to prevent any sagging.

Throw the tarp over the line so the middle of the tarp meets the cord.

Hammer in the stakes on each corner making sure it is tightly secured. If you have more stakes and available straps you can re-enforce the shelter.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 1x Guy line
  • 4x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Easy

PROS

  • Good protection from rain or snow.
  • The angle allows snow and rain to runoff the tarp

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Prone to sagging if the guy line isn’t tight enough

2. Basic Lean-to Tarp Shelter

Basic-Lean-to

The basic lean-to shelter is fast and easy to make. This is a good first one to try if you are inexperienced.

As with the A-frame you’ll need two trees to tie the guy rope around and make sure there isn’t any slack in the line.

Fold the tarp over the line.

Pull the tarp taught at around a 30 degree angle and hammer in the stakes on each end.

The stakes need to be on the outside of the shelter.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 1x Guy line
  • 2x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Easy

PROS

  • Fast and easy to erect
  • Good wind protection from one side

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Only protects from sun or wind on one side

3. Bivy Bag Cornet Shelter

bivibag-cornet

The Bivy Bag cornet design offers very good protection overall and isn’t that difficult to erect. You’ll also only need to find a single tree or point to tie the line over.

Start by tying the rope around the tree at 4-5ft and hammer in a stake to the ground at the other end. Make sure the low end is facing into the wind for maximum protection.

Throw the tarp over the rope diagonally. Stretch out the corners and hammer stakes on each side. The floor should meet up with one side and the stakes will go through both the side and floor of the shelter.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 1x Guy line
  • 5x Stakes
  • 1x Tree or pole
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good Wind Deflection
  • Good Protection from rain
  • Only need 1 tree or anchor point

CONS

  • Not much room inside

4. Adirondack Configuration Tarp Shelter

adirondack

The odd name Adirondack is named after the Adirondack mountains. This design is basically a modified Lean-to that offers more protection from the sides, front and a small floor.

Start by laying the tarp out in a diamond shape. Add pegs to the second tie out loops on either side. This will leave a triangle shape above it that can be tucked inside

Pull out the 2 front corners and peg them inline with the back.

Attach the remaining two corners to the guy rope. This will leave a triangle shape on top.

Use another guy rope to attach the remaining triangle to the ground in front creating a small cover.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 2x Guy line
  • 6x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Hard

PROS

  • Good Protection from 3 sides
  • Floor protection

CONS

  • Complex design can take a few attempts to get right
  • Takes longer than other designs
  • requires 2 guy ropes

5. C-fly Wedge

C-fly-Wedge

Start by laying the tarp on the ground. Secure the tarp to the ground at the long side edge with 2-4 pegs

If you don’t have loop cords for the bottom fold you will need to use a an extra rope to pull the fold out.

You’ll need to make a ridge line between two trees and now fold the remaining tarp over the ridge line.

Secure the handing roof-line by tying down each edge to the ground.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 3x Guy line
  • 6x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good Wind protection
  • Floor
  • Rain protection

CONS

  • Can sag
  • Unprotected from wind on 2 sides

6. Envelope Tarp Shelter Design

Envelope

The Envelope is another simple configuration that’s fairly easy to do.

This design is fast, offers good protection from the wind on one side as well as protection from the rain.

Start by finding two trees and a good place to setup. Tie the guy line between the two trees. You can also use 2 sticks or trekking poles instead of the rope.

Lay the tarp flat on the ground between the trees and peg the outside 2 corners.

On the other side use tie outs to secure the top to the guy line or poles.

Find the remaining crease and pull it to the ground. Secure with 2 more stakes.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 1x Guy line
  • 4x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Easy

PROS

  • Fast and easy to erect
  • Good wind protection from one side
  • Floor

CONS

  • No Protection from the wind on one side
  • Not the best protection from rain

7. Flat Roof Lean-To

Flat-Roof-Lean-To

The flat roof lean-to shelter is more challenging to make but offers more cover than the basic. The sloped side helps direct rain away from you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqfDIA7nidM

You’ll need to either use 2 poles or tie a guy rope around 2 trees for the roof-line.

Throw the tarp over the roof-line and stake 2 corners into the ground.

On the other side use 2 sticks or poles to support the roof on each corner.

Use 2 guy lines on each corner of the roof and stake into the ground for added support.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 3x Guy line
  • 4x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • 2x Poles or Sticks
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Good wind protection from one side
  • Rain run off on one side

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Only protects from wind on one side
  • Roof can sag from heavy rain.

8. Ground Tarp Sheet

ground-tarp

Depending on your location you may want a clean area to sit on. Can also be used inside a tarp tent such as an A-frame that has no ground cover.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 4x Stakes
  • Difficulty – Easy

PROS

  • Protection from mud and dirt
  • Simple to make

CONS

  • No protection from rain, water, wind or sun.

9. Half Box Shelter

half-box-shelter

The half box shelter offers 2 sides of protection against the wind and a cover to protect against the rain. It’s not the easiest configuration to erect and requires 4 poles or sticks of even length.

Start by folding the tarp in half. Peg in one corner first and one peg in the center to the ground. Now make a 90 degree angle and peg the other corner to the ground.

Wedge the poles or sticks into the ground on each corner.

Fold the tarp over to make the roof.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 4x Stakes
  • 4x Poles or Sticks
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Good wind protection from two sides

CONS

  • Requires 4 poles or sticks
  • Roof can sag from heavy rain.
  • Can be tricky to make

10. Hammock Shelter / Diamond Tarp Setup

hammock-Diamond-Tarp-Setup

The Diamond tarp setup is a popular one for hammock shelters. The configuration provides very good protection from rain and wind. No floor is needed due to the suspended hammock.

You’ll need to find 2 trees the right distance apart depending on the size of hammock and tarp.

Tie the hammock and guy rope around the trees. Make sure there is enough distance between the tarp and hammock.

Fold over the tarp in a diamond shape so 2 corners are pointing to the ground.

Secure each corner to the ground using 2 guy lines and stakes.

If you have tie out loops available you can secure the top corners of the tarp to the guy lines to stop them moving.

 

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 3x Guy line
  • 2x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain, sun and wind
  • Relatively easy to build

CONS

  • Requires 3 guy lines

11. Plough-Point / Diamond Fly

Plough-point---Diamond-Fly

The Plough-point or diamond fly as its sometimes referred to is a fairly simple design that’s easy to setup.

It’s spacious enough to fit 2 people inside however you sacrifice a floor for the extra space.

Lay the tarp on the floor in a diamond shape and so the tip of the diamond is pointing the tree.

Hammer a stake and end of a guy line into the diamond tip that’s furthest from the tree.

Tie a guy line roughly 5ft around a tree at around a 45 degree angle.

Stake the other 2 corners into the ground.

 

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 1x Guy line
  • 3x Stakes
  • 1x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain, sun and wind
  • Good rain run off
  • Only needs one tree.

CONS

  • No Floor
  • No protection on one side

12. Rectangular Stall

rectangular-stall

The rectangular stall is similar to the flat roof lean-to design the only real difference is the flat side.

You can either use poles or guy lines tied to two trees for support.

Lay the tarp flat on the ground and mark the corners so you know where to place the poles.

Force the poles into the ground where marked.

Place the tarp over the poles and secure.

Stake the vertical side into the ground and use 2 ropes to secure the open side corners.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 2x Guy line
  • 4x Stakes
  • 4x Poles or Sticks
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Good wind protection from one side

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Only protects from wind on one side
  • Roof can sag from heavy rain.

13. Ridge Line Lean-to

ridge-line-lean-to

The ridge line lean-to provides very good cover from the rain, sun and decent shelter from wind. However it doesn’t have a ground sheet so it’s not ideal for heavy weather.

It’s a fairly simple design but does require either poles or 2 trees for the roofline.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 3x Guy line
  • 4x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Good wind protection from two sides
  • Good rain run off on 2 sides

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Not ideal for heavy rain and wind

14. Tortilla

tortilla

This ones named the tortilla due to its shape and it’s a fast and easy shelter to set up.

Use 2 guy lines on each corner of the roof and stake into the ground for added support.

You’ll need a pole or tree to tie the guy rope around at a height of 4-5ft.

Lay the tarp down in a diamond shape with one tip facing the tree.

Fold in half using the top half tip closest to the tree to tie the guy line.

Peg the far edge corners into the ground where the fold has been made.

Peg the bottom diamond tip into the ground.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 1x Guy line
  • 3x Stakes
  • 1x Tree or pole
  • Difficulty – Easy

PROS

  • Great protection from the wind on one side
  • Good protection from the sun
  • Easy to setup

CONS

  • Single side protection from sun and wind

15. Basic Fly Line Roof

Basic-Fly-Line-Roof

The basic fly line roof or Sunshade tarp as its sometimes know is perfect for creating shade and protection against the sun.

It can also be used for protection against the rain however in heavy rain the water can collect in the center making the roof sag.

The tarp will lay flat above your head using the guy ropes for support.

You can either use 4 trees with 2 guy lines or 4 poles for support.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 2x Guy line
  • 4x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Easy

PROS

  • Great shelter for the sun.
  • Easy to make

CONS

  • Requires 4 near by trees or poles
  • Not ideal for the rain
  • Can sag easily in the rain.
  • No protection from the wind

16. Basic Fly Roof Using Poles

Basic-Fly-poles-Roof

The basic fly roof is the same design as the sunshade shelter but uses poles with guy ropes instead.

The downside is you’ll have to bring the extra poles along with you or have access to long sticks or branches.

4 guy lines are needed to secure each corner and stop it falling over.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 4x Guy line
  • 4x Stakes
  • 4x Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Great shelter from the sun.

CONS

  • Requires 4 poles or branches
  • Only protects from the sun and light rain
  • Heavy rain can collect in the center making it sag.

17. Body Bag

body-bag

The body bag tarp shelter or tube tent provides decent cover all round. It’s similar in shape to the A-frame however the body bag also has ground cover.

You give up space for the ground cover but this will be big enough for 1 large adult person.

You’ll need to hang the guy line between 2 trees slightly lower than normal. You can adjust the line height if you find it is to high.

Fold the tarp over the guy line and make sure opposite ends both meet on one side.

Secure each opposite end into the ground using stakes.

Stake the folded side into the ground to complete the shelter.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 1x Guy line
  • 4x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good protection from the wind, rain and sun
  • Ground cover
  • Good rain run off on both sides.

CONS

  • Small size inside

18. Dining Fly

Dining-Fly

The dining fly is a popular design with good reason. It provides a lot of space, offers good shade and shelter from the rain.

Some downsides include the lack of wind protection and ground cover.

Depending on the size of the poles used will determine how much head room you will have.

There should be enough room underneath for a table and some chairs.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 6x Guy line
  • 6x Stakes
  • 2x Poles or Sticks
  • Difficulty – Hard

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Lots of room
  • Good rain run off

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Little protection from the wind

19. Forrester

forrester

The forrester is a relatively complex design but offers very good all around protection from the elements.

You also don’t need much gear and only a single tree or pole for the guy rope.

It’s almost the same design as the bivi bag cornet but with the added protection flaps at the opening.

A pole can be used to prop up the entrance instead of a guy rope.

 

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 1x Guy line
  • 3x Stakes
  • 1x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Hard

PROS

  • Great protection from rain, sun and wind.
  • Not much gear required to make

CONS

  • More complicated than other layouts
  • Can be fiddly to make

20. Half Cone Fly

Half-Cone-Fly

The half cone fly shelter offers very good protection all round as well. The low profile keeps out wind but reduces the amount of space inside.

Unlike other similar designs there is no ground protection.

 

 

 

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 3x Guy line
  • 3x Stakes
  • 1x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Good wind protection

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Low profile means less room

21. Holden Tent

Holden-Tent

The Holden tarp tent is a simple but effective tarp shelter that’s easy and fast to make.

Ideal for a square shaped tarp but you can use other sizes.

Place the tarp on the ground and stake in the one of the long edges.

Find the center of the opposite long side. Place a pole under this point and raise.

Stake the front corners so they are angled inwards for maximum protection.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 4x Stakes
  • 1x  Pole
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Can be made quickly and easily
  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Good wind protection
  • Limited gear required.

CONS

  • No Floor
  • No wind protection at the entrance

22. Partial Pyramid

Partial-Pyramid

The Partial pyramid design is not the easiest to make but offers good protection.

The diamond tipped pyramid shape allows the rain to drain off the edges and stops any sagging.

The shape also offers very good shelter from the winds on 2 sides.

 

 

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 4x Guy line
  • 6x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Hard

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Good wind protection from 2 sides
  • Good rain run off

CONS

  • Difficult to make
  • Requires more gear than other designs
  • Little protection at the entrance.

23. Sentry Box

sentry-box

The sentry box tarp shelter is similar to the half box shape however it offers protection from 3 sides.

You’ll need to find 4 trees close by or use 4 poles for the roof lines.

The amount of room and height will depend on the size of tarp you have. The design can be used for as a shelter for a camp toilet.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 2x Guy line
  • 4x Stakes
  • 4x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Protection from winds on 3 sides
  • Can be used for a camping toilet shelter

CONS

  • Can blow out in high winds
  • no protection on one side.

24. Square Arch

square-arch

The square arch is a fairly simple design that can be made quickly.

Attach 2 guy ropes around 2 trees at about 3ft height depending on the size of the tarp.

Throw the tarp over the guy ropes and put 3 stakes into the ground on each side.

It’s a good idea to place one guy rope higher than the other to make an angled roof. This will allow water to run off. Otherwise the roof could start collecting rain and cause it to sag.

The shelter should be long enough and wide enough to fit 2 adults side by side.

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 2x Guy line
  • 6x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Moderate

PROS

  • Quick set up
  • Good shelter from the rain and sun
  • Good wind protection

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Might be hard to find correctly aligned trees

25. Toque Tent

Toque-Tent

The Toque tent tarp configuration is great for protection against rain wind and sun but lacks any ground cover. It is also one of the more complicated designs.

You’ll need two find to trees to tie the guy rope around or use 2 poles.

Make sure the tarps center tie out loop is attached to the roofline guy rope.

From the same center tie out also attach 2 more guy ropes and  thread them through the tie outs on the bottom corners as in the picture. Then stake these two ropes into the ground.

Stake the remaining three corners into the ground.

 

You’ll need at least the following:

  • 3x Guy line
  • 5x Stakes
  • 2x Trees or Poles
  • Difficulty – Hard

PROS

  • Good shelter from the rain, sun and wind.
  • Good all around rain run off.

CONS

  • No Floor
  • Can be complicated to make

Linked from: http://rollingfox.com/how-to-make-a-tarp-tent-with-designs?pp=1

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DIY Zero-Electricity Air Cooler From Plastic Bottles

Plastic-Bottle-Air-Cooler-2

Have you ever heard of Bernoulli’s principle? It’s a cornerstone of fluid dynamics. Without an understanding of fluid dynamics the modern air conditioner wouldn’t be possible. Ah, the modern eclectic air conditioner, some can argue it is the greatest invention of the twentieth century. Viewed by some as a convenience, in truth, it has made places like the American southwest hospitable.

Even though efficiency of these units has come a long way, the average window unit still draws a massive amount of power, easily drawing a hundred times more than a LED lightbulb. So how can we keep cool in a grid down situation? This video shows how simple ingenuity and recycled materials can take advantage of Bernoulli’s principle to provide some relief from the heat!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PLiUEq78Q_BhHTtOol74cc6wbze8gx_j3E&v=oSbZWNk84F4

Linked from: http://prepforshtf.com/diy-zero-electricity-air-cooler-plastic-bottles/

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3 Ways to Prep Your Fridge and Freezer for a Summer Power Outage

fridge

It really is a luxury to have an appliance that makes things very cold (or freezes them) in the heat of summer. But it’s a luxury that many people have become far too reliant upon. What happens to the 100 pounds of meat and fish you stored in the freezer…after the power goes out…when it’s 100 degrees outside? It’s not pretty, I’ll tell you that much. I had a freezer break down in the mid-summer heat a few years ago. It was a freezer full of animal hides, feathers, brain-tanned buckskin in process, and the meat from two whitetail deer. The freezer was in an outbuilding, and I didn’t discover the mess until it had all liquefied and the stench was apparent from outside the building. I don’t want anybody to go through something like that, especially during a summer utility outage. So here are a few ideas about what to keep and what not to keep in your freezer, just in case your power goes out this season.

1. Set Up an Ice Cube Watchdog 
Planning a summer vacation or some other exodus? That’s great. But what if your power is out for days while you’re gone, the food in your freezer spoils, then the power comes back and the freezer re-freezes it? Chances are good that eating this food would make you sick, perhaps very sick. But there’s a simple way to see if your freezer was off in your absence. Fill a cup with ice cubes and leave it in your freezer. As long as your ice cubes look like separate ice cubes, your freezer stayed below freezing. But if you open the freezer one day and find a cup of frozen water—your power was off long enough for everything to melt before it re-froze. If that’s the case, the food shouldn’t be considered safe for human consumption.

2. Keep It Full
We’ve all heard that a stuffed freezer is more efficient, but do we really want it stuffed with food that would be wasted in a lengthy power outage? I keep lots of ice in my freezer, a bit of ice cream or some other frozen treats, and not much else. In an outage, I can use the ice to keep the fridge food cold for an extra day and when the ice has melted—use it for drinking water. It’s great to have extra food, but you’ll be better off canning or drying your meat and other foods rather than taking the risk of losing them in the freezer.

3. Consider a Generator
If you already have a freezer full of meat, and aren’t interested in canning it all, then make plans to keep the freezer running with a generator. If you cannot afford to buy one, line up a loan from a friend or family member who has one. I’m usually opposed to generators. The noise, the dangerous fumes, the fire hazard, and the potentially limited fuel supply have turned me away from the standard gas powered generator, but it does still have its uses.

Linked from: http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/survivalist/3-ways-prep-your-fridge-and-freezer-summer-power-outage

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Survival Fitness 101: Boost Your Strength, Stamina, Speed & Flexibility

runner-555074_640

When SHTF, you better be in shape and your fitness level now is probably not as great as you will wish it was in a survival situation. In emergencies, our bodies are going to be called into action that a lot of us aren’t used to, there will be more stress, less rest and more muscle strength required. Even if you are physically active now, the routine chores that you could find yourself doing will tax your muscles and stamina in a way that in the best case scenario will take some getting used to.

When finding food isn’t achieved by walking to the fridge or pulling around to the drive-thru and cleaning up involves a lot more than jumping in the shower, your body will need to adjust. That doesn’t even get into the possibilities of running for your life or defending yourself from violence. Now is the time to make sure that your survival fitness levels are as good as they can be.

Here is what every single survivalist should know about getting fit and staying strong before the apocalypse strikes.

Strength

You don’t need a fancy weight room or home gym to get stronger. You can improve your strength with nothing more than the items that you already have at home. Filling socks with grains or rice can make for weights. Cans of soup work just as well, too. Chopping wood also builds up your strength.

fitness-375472_640

Even your bug out bag, which should have supplies like clothing, food, water and other necessary items like sunglasses and replaceable lenses, weapons and electronics, can come in handy for a home workout to improve your strength. Strap it on — don’t take anything out — and do your workout. This way you’re even more prepared for TEOTWAWKI since you’re training with your full pack.

Home workouts are just fine. But if you’re searching for something more intense, other workouts, like CrossFit, can challenge all of your muscle groups. In addition to challenging you physically, the group fitness program also challenges you mentally. Find a CrossFit box to join in your community and get fit with a like-minded community of fitness fanatics.

Stamina

You’re going to be counting on your endurance in any survival situation, and that goes for surviving the end of the world, too. Stamina gives you the necessary power to boost you through any physical activity at your peak. Stamina depends on a healthy, lean diet, regular fitness and an overall healthy lifestyle. Aerobic activities that work all of your muscles and get your heart pumping, like running or riding a bike, can help boost your endurance and should be done regularly. The American College of Sports Medicine reports that weight training also benefits stamina. Sleep is also crucial to building up your endurance.

Flexibility

Yoga isn’t just for green-juice-drinking hippies. It can make you stronger and more flexible. And believe it or not, these things can help you survive the world’s end. Yoga can help you develop a strong core, which gives you more power and control over your body, and it also improves your balance. If your body is flexible, you are going to be less likely to suffer from a pulled muscle when you’re out in the field. Yoga can even make you more agile.

men-1179452_640

You don’t even have to leave your house to learn yoga, you just need an Internet connection. Man Flow Yoga has online classes that are structured just for men.

Speed

You’ve got to be able to outrun the enemy. And newsflash, you’re not going to be able to do that if you’re sitting idle on the couch. You need to start running. Do something that works for you. If you’re comfortable running for 30 minutes at a consistent pace, it’s time to do something that makes you faster. Add more mileage to your runs, but remember that you still need to take days off from your training.

Linked from: http://www.theprepperjournal.com/2016/07/14/survival-fitness-101-boost-strength-stamina-speed-flexibility/

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DIY Treatments for Sunburns

homemade-sunscreen

Summertime is an excellent time to get outside, but with hot temperatures, there comes the possibility of getting sunburned. Since the Earth’s axis is tilted, the sun’s rays hit the planet at a steeper angle during the warmer months, increasing the amount of light that strikes at a given point. Plus, the longer daylight hours mean that there’s more time for the temperatures to rise.

Consequently, there’s the potential for you and your loved ones to suffer sunburns. Depending on their severity, sunburns can be extremely painful. They can also lead to blisters, swelling, infection and even headache, fever, chills, and fatigue requiring medical attention if the sunburn is serious enough.

Most minor sunburns, however, can be treated at home using items you already have around the house. There are a few different options.

  1. Use compresses – Immediately after getting sunburned, the skin is often inflamed. You can minimize the inflammation by applying a compress. Try dipping a cloth in cold water and applying for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. For inflammation, you can also apply witch hazel with a cloth or cotton balls. For relief from itching, apply a powder with aluminum acetate.
  2. Apply natural remedies – For pain that often accompanies sunburn, you can apply several natural remedies either directly on the burn or via a cloth. These household items include water and oatmeal, boiled lettuce, yogurt, tea bags soaked in cool water, cornstarch with enough water to be mixed into a paste, and fat-free milk mixed with water and ice cubes.
  3. Take a bath – It’s important to never use soap following a burn. Soap dries and irritates the skin that’s already been damaged. Avoid bubble baths and soaking in soapy water. Instead, rinse the skin with cool (not hot) water, and consider soaking the affected area in cool water. You can also soothe the pain by adding baking soda or vinegar to the bath.
  4. Use Moisturizers – Sunburned skin is dried out, so it makes sense to add moisture back to your skin by applying moisturizing lotion. (Lotion with aloe is a plus.) Be sure to drink lots of water to add moisture back into your body as well. It also helps to eat a balanced diet to provide the nutrients your body needs to heal.
  5. Get some rest – Your body will need lots of rest in order to heal. However, sleeping on a sunburn can be a challenge. Sprinkle talcum powder on the sheets to make your bed more Plus, satin sheets can help provide relief to dry, itchy skin.

Of course, prevention is the best way to minimize the damage that sunburns can do. Use sunscreen with a minimum of SPF 15 when going outside. Reapply sunscreen as necessary, especially after sweating and swimming. Wear protective clothing like hats that shade your face and lightweight fabrics. Try to avoid the hours between 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. when the sun is strongest.

Linked from: http://www.survivalbased.com/survival-blog/8841/diy-treatments-for-sunburns/