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23 Motives to Prep Even If Doomsday Never Arrives

23 Motives to Prep Even If Doomsday Never Arrives

There are two types of people in this world:  The ones who prepare for the worst case scenario, and those who don’t.  Often you’ll hear people who don’t prepare for SHTF say things like “what will you do if SHTF never happens?”  But even if doomsday never comes, the people who prepare are actually better off than those who aren’t prepared for SHTF.  And here are 23 reasons why you should keep prepping even if SHTF never happens:

  1. Self-Defense: It’s no surprise that doomsday preppers are ready to keep their families safe from violence in SHTF.  Between street muggings and home invasions, normal everyday crime still poses a threat to us.  Having self-protection skills are a plus in SHTF or normal society. So, check out the best MMA self-defense techniques.
  1. Leadership: If you’ve been prepping for SHTF, you probably realize that a crisis requires a leader.  If you’ve studied on any leadership skills while getting ready for the big event, you’ve probably exhibited some of those qualities.  Leadership qualities aren’t a waste of time.   They can help you at home, at work, with friends.  Everyone wants to be around a strong leader.
  1. Inflation: The thought of a “weaker” national dollar or euro might scare some, but not the prepper.  When a prepper has 3 years supply of toilet paper, food and other toiletries, those goods are purchased at the price of “yesterday”.  Even if SHTF doesn’t happen, the prepper becomes insulated to the loss of purchasing power that people who have to buy groceries every week suffer.  It’s a great way to protect your wealth over time.
  1. First-Aid: In normal society people still get cuts, broken bones and need a first-responder.  If you’re prepared for anything, you are prepared for first-aid. And those skills and supplies may not go unused even if “S” doesn’t “HTF”.
  1. Droughts: The lack of water seems really scary to some, but to a prepper it’s just another hurdle to tackle.  From collecting and storing water to rationing and purifying water, the doomsday prepper can handle this naturally occurring disaster.  The end of the world might not come but the prepper will probably never go thirsty. Here’s how to can water for emergencies.
  1. Discipline: If you’ve been putting away food, water and training for the worst case scenario, you probably have discipline. The will to keep at something that may never happen shows dedication and a will to force yourself to “drive-on”. There are so many facets of normal life that exceptional discipline will pay off.  The prepper need not experience SHTF to be better off with good discipline. Keep prepping!
  1. Long-term Planning Skills: Along with discipline, long-term planning skills can help corporate employees improve the function of their department. Who knows, long-term planning skills could lead to a nice job promotion.
  1. Organizational Skills: Whether you’re in the corporate world or working in a skilled trade, better organizational skills will not go unused. Even if SHTF doesn’t happen, your boss and co-workers will love the better organized environment that you create.
  1. Fitness: To survive SHTF, you have to be in relatively good physical condition. But don’t let your health go if doomsday never happens. Your energy level, quality of life and cognitive outlook all benefit from excellent fitness levels.
  1. Dwelling Construction & Repair: Patching a roof to seal out the weather, insulating a house with no heat; these are concepts applicable to anyone who owns a home. Investing the time to learn to repair your home is a worthy endeavor. Whether SHTF comes along or not, you’ll save a lot of money doing your own house repairs.
  1. Automobile Maintenance: Similar to home repair, automobile repair is a handy skill for preppers, specifically so they can keep their bug-gout vehicle working. But just think of all the money you save by learning to repair your own vehicle, even if a post-apocalyptic never happens.
  1. Gardening: Growing your own food is a great way to lower your overall food bill. Even in the winter, if you are into canning, your family can enjoy the “fruits of your labor” all year long. Gardening is not just for preppers!
  1. Self-Sufficiency – Being self-sufficient has its perks. One of the nice things about being self-sufficient is that even if SHTF doesn’t happen, localized emergencies happen all the time. If you “prep” you won’t have to rely on intervention from government services, and in fact, you may be able to help your community if you’re prepared enough.
  1. Income Loss: We all suffer job loss from time to time. One of the major benefits of keeping a well-stocked pantry is that in the even that your income is severally cut, you can go quite a while without assistance from others. A good size pantry is a great insurance plan!
  1. Family Traditions: While you’re canning, gardening and baking , you’ll make traditions. Traditions are born out of the way families do things required to survive (such as baking, farming, gardening, etc.). Even if the grid never goes down, when you’re prepping with your family, you’re building wonderful bonds.
  1. Outdoor Survival Skills: All those outdoor survival skills you’ve gained while preparing for the end of the world . . . they won’t be lost on you or your family. Get out and go camping, real camping in the middle of the wilderness. Again this ties back into building traditions. Gaining outdoor survival skills are a great way to get ready for a camping trip of a lifetime.
  1. Tools: If you’re like me, you’ve stock piled several sets of every kind of tool you come across. And it’s done with good reason. If SHTF you’ll be able to barter for necessary items with the valuable tools you have. But I also like having extras of each type of tool to loan out to friends and give as “bond building” gifts to neighbors in need. Giving tools is a great way to build rapport and rapport is worth more than money, SHTF or not.
  1. Floods & Fires: Surviving floods and fires requires a special kind of person. A person who can bug-gout at a moment’s notice and get their loved ones to safety. Who’s better prepared to do that than a survivalist? People who aren’t into SHTF prepping are probably a lot more likely to listen to you about preparing for a flood or fire than the end of the world. Preppers should be experts on this topic.
  1. Earthquakes & Tornadoes: These types of disasters are common and requirean important but different set of skills than preparing for floods and fires. While doomsday isn’t here yet, one’s community might call on the prepper to use their search and rescue skills to locate folks after such events.
  1. Improvisation: We live in a disposable society. If something breaks we throw it away. But the prepper will find a way to fix what breaks or re-purpose it to something useful. When all the hardware stores are closed and you need a quick fix on your basement sub-pump, the prepper is a great person to know.
  1. Worry Free: By and large, preppers should live worry free. While they’re prepared for the worst case scenario, they are better prepared than 90% of the people around the globe. SHTF may happen, it may not, but either way, the prepping family “has it covered”.
  1. Interpersonal Skills: Dealing with difficult people can be a pain in a doomsday situation and in regular life.  But the prepper excels with great interpersonal skills, because he/she knows that dealing favorably with other people gets you far in life. The prepper has a spot in their library for “How to Win Friends and Influence People”.
  1. Motivation: Last and certainly not least is the concept of motivation. All the prepping, learning, doing and helping others is not in vain if S doesn’t HTF. If nothing else, the prepper motivates people to keep taking strides to be self-sufficient, help their community and secure their family.

Take heart, when other say “what if the end of the world never happens?”. You’ve got things covered either way. You have peace of mind. And all of your prepping is useful in many other ways. Don’t quit being prepared, you never know who’s watching, and who becomes inspired.

http://www.prepperwebsite.com/

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Crisis at Work: Hurricane and Emergency Preparedness for Small Businesses

Hurricane Sandy, Ocean Grove Pier - New Jersey, October 29, 1012 - Photograph by Bob Bowné

Let’s start at the very beginning. Why do you need a small business disaster recovery plan? The answer is simple. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), nearly 40 percent of small businesses never reopen after a disaster. An even greater number fail within 1 to 3 years, due to insurmountable losses.

While the recent devastation from Hurricane Matthew may lead some to believe that business emergency preparedness applies only to large storms or natural disasters, the fact is that there are many emergencies you should prepare for that can interrupt operations and profitability, from localized outages to random fires, floods and more.

According to the 2014 Disaster Recovery Preparedness Benchmark Survey, over 75% of businesses have experienced the loss of at least one critical application after a power outage – leading to an estimated cost of more than $5,000 per minute. For tech reliant companies, that’s a lot to put at stake for lack of preparation.

While there are many kinds of disasters that can strike and many reasons that businesses may fail afterward, doing your business disaster planning ahead of time is an essential step to being able to recover, reopen and recoup your losses in the event of any emergency. It’s crucial not only to have the correct insurance plans in place to protect your physical assets, but also to have strong business continuity and emergency preparedness plans so during a crisis situation at work, you can put your company in position to survive.

How Do Disasters Impact Small Businesses?

Beyond the immediate economic impact of a shutdown, business disruption due to floods and hurricanes, fires, outages and other emergencies can impact your company’s chances of survival in many ways.

Physical Damage

The first way that your business could be impacted is though physical damage to the premises and facility, including the building itself, pipes, ventilation systems and more. Consider what emergencies have happened in your area before and how they’ve impacted the businesses around you. What would the cost of not doing business for an hour, day, week or even longer be? It’s time to consider how to mitigate those losses. Review your insurance policies now – the cost to rebuild is often what results in closed doors.

1994, Los Angeles, California, USA --- Original caption: Los Angeles, California: Earthquake Aftermath. --- Image by © David Butow/Corbis

1994, Los Angeles, California, USA – Image by © David Butow/Corbis

Staffing and Clients

The second way a business will be impacted during an emergency is in staffing and customer retention. Employees may be evacuated or otherwise unable to come to work during the disaster, while significant damage to the area may impact both your staff and customers’ ability to return to their homes, jobs and consumer behaviors. What plans do you have in place to prepare for a change in your staffing or client base? Consider having a remote operations plan to ensure essential services continue in the event of on-site interference.

Business Disaster Planning: Be Prepared in Advance

The basics of business disaster planning have to do with effective preparation, testing, training and leadership. You have to prepare your small business continuity and recovery plans, test them regularly, train your people to perform their roles and have strong leaders in place to ensure they’re carried out when disaster strikes.

Getting Your Business Ready

Here are some of the technical things you might want to consider investing in now so you don’t regret it after a disaster:

  • Lightweight laptop that’s connected to essential business systems
  • Cell phone with mobile Wi-Fi capabilities or another sources of localized Wi-Fi connectivity
  • Cloud storage for essential documents
  • Off-premise operations hub

With cloud storage becoming more and more accessible and affordable, I highly recommend you save important business documents to a cloud storage platform, so you can still access crucial information should your on-site records be unsalvageable. It’s also important to consider where you’ll base operations if an evacuation order is issued or you’re otherwise unable to use your current facility due to damage

If you end up stranded in the office, you’ll also want to have what I call a “business BOB” on hand. Keep your bug-out bag in an area you’ll be able to access in an emergency, and stock it with essential items that can make the difference between life and death when you’re stranded at work.

Your business BOB should include enough supplies to support the people in your office for at least 72 hours:

  • Nonperishable foods and a way to prepare them – consider what you’ll do if there’s no power
  • Water, and plenty of it
  • A first aid kit, medical supplies and basic toiletries including soap, toothbrushes and toothpaste, deodorant, feminine products, baby wipes, toilet paper, hand sanitizer, etc.
  • Flashlights/Headlamp
  • Blankets
  • A toolkit including a compass, flashlights, duct tape, lighters, and other common tools

You may also want to consider having backup systems of defense should your alarm systems go out – especially if your facility is at high-risk for looting or other forms of opportunism that are common during emergencies.

emergency-preparedness

Getting Your People Ready

When it comes to human resources, the most important thing to consider is leadership and communication.

  • Establish leadership in advance. You should choose leaders with a high degree of trust, integrity, capability and experience.
    • Who should employees go to with questions about their work during an emergency? If you are stranded on-site, you’ll need leaders to supervise different essential areas, including food, defense, medical services and even conflict resolution.
  • Establish communications systems, buddy systems and meeting places. What will you do if wireless networks are down and you’re stranded at work?
    • Consider having a battery-operated, solar or reliable ham radio, satellite phone and other emergency communication systems on hand that can allow two-way communication and information delivery when cell phone towers and other business systems are down.
    • Sign up for alerts from the Red Cross and local authorities so you stay up-to-date on the state of the emergency.
  • Make sure every member of the team has a role and a job to do. Consider individual skill-sets – including any medical, counseling or defense training – and how they would be best put to use. Giving everyone a role not only expands the human resources you have available, but it also helps keep people calm in a crisis situation.

Long before disaster strikes, the business continuity plans you create must be shared with and practiced by employees so they know exactly what to do before panic sets in. Test your plans regularly, train employees to carry it out, assess effectiveness and always solicit for feedback. Having a plan will do nothing if it’s not tested, refined and continually refreshed.

It’s also smart to communicate your emergency and business continuity plans with any business partners who may be impacted by an interruption in your operations so they, too, know what to expect. Alerting them in advance will help them know how to stay in touch with you and help you avoid increased losses both during and after disaster.

Crisis at Work: Putting Your Plan into Action

If you’ve prepared well in advanced, you should be able to put your emergency business continuity and disaster recovery plans into action relatively smoothly. Of course, during a disaster, nothing is for sure, so here are a few tips to ensure you stay as safe as possible:

  • Immediately deploy your emergency communications system when disaster strikes to keep staff and customers alert, aware and ready to act.
  • Always follow evacuation orders and use the information available to get employees and personnel safely out of harm’s way before disaster strikes.
  • If you’re unable to exit the premises in an emergency, secure your location, people, supplies and equipment.
  • Remember that every member of your organization has value in an emergency. Just like managers look for employees’ best use when it comes to day-to-day operations, it’s important that you find the best way for everyone to contribute in an emergency so that no one feels helpless or alone.

That last point is probably the most important – beyond actually having a small business emergency recovery plan in place. Emotions run high in emergency situations, so you need to be ready to help people cope. Being sufficiently prepared prior to a disaster will go a long way to keeping everyone calm and collected until you make it safely to the other side.

Small Business Disaster Planning Resources

Explore FEMA’s Small Business Preparedness Toolkit, featuring a range of resources and planning documents.

Use the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Sample Emergency Preparedness Checklist to create your own disaster checklist today.

Specific disaster preparedness information and sample assessment forms for small businesses are available at PrepareMyBusiness.org.

Get more resources from the Small Business Association:

  • Disaster Assistance Information to help you recover after a disaster.
  • Disaster Planning Resources to guide your emergency preparedness and business continuity plans and protect your assets during a disaster.
  • Also find Emergency Preparedness Resources that cover different types of natural and manmade disasters

Linked from: http://www.theprepperjournal.com/2016/10/27/crisis-at-work-hurricane-and-emergency-preparedness-for-small-businesses/

 

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Orlando Shootings: More To Come, What To Do

active shooter

Active Shooters: What to Do

In the sad aftermath of the Orlando shootings that killed or injured more than 100 people, it has become clear to me that we’re in for a rough ride for the foreseeable future.

You might think that the “success” achieved by Omar Mateen in executing his terror event was a fluke. The sheer number of casualties was the most ever on American soil. The complexities of Mr. Mateen’s relationship with the community, having apparently visited the PULSE nightclub on multiple occasions, must make this a rare circumstance, right? Wrong.

nightclub

Pulse Nightclub, Wikipedia

The shooter’s assessment of his target as being a “soft” one was deadly accurate. A crowded venue, maybe all in one large room with limited exits, some allegedly padlocked. At 2 o’clock in the morning, many club goers must have had some drinks, and weren’t exactly in a condition to be situationally aware. Likely, no one was armed. It was a massacre and, worse, a blueprint for massacres to come.

Those who support Mr. Mateen’s philosophy will look at this event and marvel at how much damage a single gunman can do. This can only encourage others of like mind to do the same. How many nightclubs are there, gay or straight, that’ll be crowded on a Saturday night in the average city? How many club goers will be ready for the next gunman? How many establishments will act to boost security in the face of this horrible tragedy? I’ve answered these questions myself, and I am saddened.

The Islamic State giving credit to this terrorist will seem like a badge of honor to those who wish us harm. They see cowardly acts as courageous. They see mayhem as morality. They know that most Americans have gone soft, and that’s a hard truth.

We now know that mass shootings can occur anywhere, anytime. They can occur in churches, schools, nightclubs, and at holiday parties. They can occur at 2 in the morning and they can occur in the middle of the day. What would be your response if confronted?

The natural response for most people is to do nothing. You’ve heard me talk about “normalcy bias” before. That’s the tendency for people to believe everything follows a pattern and that the day will proceed normally because it always has. When a terrorist event breaks that pattern, however,  the unprepared brain takes time to process the new situation. People will think that the sound of gunfire is fireworks, or anything less threatening than an assassin out to kill them.

A person without a plan of action typically follows the herd. If fifty people around you drop to the floor, your natural tendency is to do the same. Cowering in fear under a table in plain view of the shooter isn’t a recipe for a good outcome. But having a plan will give you a better chance of getting out of there in one piece.

During an active shooter event, what you do in the first few seconds may determine whether you live or die. Give yourself a head start by always knowing what’s happening around you. We call this situational awareness. Know where exits are. Know where the gunshots are coming from. Know who appears nervous or suspicious in your immediate area.

Sounds simple, doesn’t it? But in this era of people immersed in their smartphones, few are situationally aware and become easy targets for the active shooter.

Run, Hide, Fight

run hide fight

If you find yourself in the middle of a terrorist event, you should remember these three words: Run, Hide, Fight. Just as “Stop, Drop, and Roll” can save the life of someone on fire, “Run, Hide, Fight” might save the life of someoneunder fire. This is the order of the actions that you should be taking in an active shooter scenario.

Run

Most people will hide as their first course of action. You, however, should run away from the direction of gunfire immediately, leaving through those exits you’ve been mentally marking. This will make it less likely you and the shooter will cross paths. Forget about collecting your stuff, it will only slow you down and, let’s face it, it’s just stuff.

A kind of paralysis may occur when you first realize what’s happening. This is normal, but running away from the shooter increases your distance from them, and makes it difficult for them to hit a moving target.

A good citizen would yell for others to follow and prevent others from entering the kill zone. Don’t try to move or otherwise help the wounded, however. You have to get out of there; becoming the next casualty does no one any good. Even the police will leave the injured for after the shooter has been neutralized.

(One very important note: If you see law enforcement, don’t run up and hug them. Get your hands in the air, fingers spread, where officers can see them. They need to know you’re not the threat. Follow any instructions given and leave in the directions the officer came from.)

Once you’re in a safe area, call 911 if rescuers have not yet arrived.

Hide

hide

If there’s only one exit and the shooter is standing in front of it, running might not be an option. Your next choice is hiding.

You have to get out of the shooter’s line of sight, but hiding under a table in the same room as the shooter is a very bad idea. Get into another room, preferably one with a door you can lock. If there is no lock, put together a barrier with desks and chairs. Turn off the lights, silence your cell phone, and stay quiet behind an additional barrier like a table or in a closet. If you can quietly alert authorities, do so.

By accomplishing the above, you’ve just made yourself a harder target to acquire for the shooter, and he wants to do his damage as fast as possible. He’ll likely pass you by to find easier targets.

Fight

fight

What if you can’t run, and there is no reasonable hiding place? You just might have to fight your way out of there. This strategy isn’t always doomed to failure. You still might be able to drop an attacker even if unarmed. Three unarmed men were able to do it to a shooter on a train in Paris. It’s a last resort, but it can work; it did there.

If you don’t fight, the shooter will have a clear shot to your head and death is likely. If you fight, you’ll be harder to hit with a fatal shot. Any type of aggression against the gunman would disrupt their “flow” and possibly put you at an advantage. If you can, approach him from the side or rear, and go for his weapon.

If you have help, all should attack at the same time from different directions while hurling objects that he has to dodge. At the PULSE nightclub, there were probably drinking glasses and bottles handy, not to mention hundreds of cell phones.  The gunman is probably not James Bond: he’ll duck or flinch and not be able to handle multiple threats at once. Imagine a half-dozen people charging you while throwing stuff at your head. Makes for a pretty nervous terrorist, I’d say.

If you’ve disrupted the shooter or, better, gotten the weapon out of his hands, inflict damage on him until he is out of the fight. Tough, I’ll admit, but these are tough times; commit to your actions.

Luckily, few people will find themselves in the midst of a terrorist attack like the one in Orlando, but you can bet more are coming. Having a plan for active shooter situations is galling to some, but it’s part of life in the New Normal. Those who are prepared will have a better chance to survive terror events and many other disasters in the uncertain future.

Linked from: https://www.doomandbloom.net/orlando-shootings/

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Make an Evacuation Checklist

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You wake with a start in the middle of the night. Someone is banging on your front door. A gas main has broken one block over. You have 10 minutes to get out of your house. What do you do? An up-to-datechecklist for evacuations is the key.

How you respond to a scary scenario depends on a wide variety of things, but comes down to one key factor: How prepared are you to leave your house?

During a wildfire event several years ago out west, our friends had to evacuate their home. They initially believed their home would be safe but an unexpected shift in the wind required them to leave very quickly. They were not at all prepared but loaded up their minivan, drove out of harm’s way, and to a community shelter. Fortunately, their home was spared and they were able to return two days later. When they unpacked their car, they realized that what they took out last was what was packed first.

What was it that they, in their panic, decided to put into the car first to save it from wildfire?

Their bowling balls.

You know what never made it into their car?

Their important paperwork that was in a filing cabinet, which wasn’t fireproof.

They simply weren’t prepared to evacuate and when suddenly told to get out, they weren’t in a proper mental state to make the best decisions.

With some events, like a hurricane, you may have hours or days to plan how to leave your home and to get packed up. Other incidents like a broken gas main, nuclear power plant incident, or a chemical spill require you to leave quickly and usually come with no advanced warning. Being told suddenly you must leave your home is no time to be making important decisions regarding what to put in your car.

Know how to plan for 2 types of evacuations: urgent and planned.

Make an evacuation checklist

Below is our list (made more basic and a little less personal for this article) that we’ll use upon deciding to evacuate our home. Since we have teenagers, all items on the list can be performed by anyone. If you have younger kids, you may want to have a separate list of things they can do.

Our plan is that one person controls the list and assigns the tasks. When a job is complete, the person gets the next task. Each action is placed in order of importance in case the entire list can’t be completed. If time has run out, we drop to the “Final Actions” portion and go.

Evacuation To Do List
Shoes on
Animals in crates
Bug out bags in car
Pet supplies in car
Emergency binder in car
Purses/wallets/cell phones/chargers in car
Fireproof safes in car — (In a house fire, leave the safes where they are and just get out!)
Supply bins in car
Water bottles in car
Pack additional personal items and put in car
Pack additional clothing items and put in car
Pack additional food items and put in car

Optional Actions Based on Situation
Water off
Gas off

Final Actions
Animals in car
Lock all doors (pins in sliding doors)
Set security alarm
All people in car

Each family member has a list of three or four “personal items” that they want to have during the evacuation. This not only helps packing go more quickly (again, because the decisions have already been made), but also ensures that if someone isn’t home, the others can grab the correct items. For my family, these items include specific photo albums, laptop computers and external drives, stuffed animals, and prized possessions.

Use this Last Minute Checklist for items that can’t be pre-packed, such as medications.

Be sure the list is somewhere accessible to all. We keep ours laminated and attached via carabiner to a bug out bag.

“Evacuation Drill!”

As with any preparedness activity, running through a practice drill is the only way to know if your plan will work. Set aside some time when your family doesn’t expect it, and announce, “EVACUATION DRILL!” Go through the entire process of actually loading these things into the car just as if you are actually leaving your home.

Set a timer and see how long it takes to get through the whole list. You may discover that moving a supply bin is a two person job, or that items must be placed in your car in a particular way in order to fit everything in the trunk. You don’t want an emergency to be the first time you test your list and your family.

“If the generals don’t panic, the troops won’t panic.”

Not only does an evacuation list provide you with a pre-determined plan that will ensure you have what you need when you leave your home, but it will also help alleviate panic in the process. As you lead your family to safety, you’ll be doing so in a more calm manner, which will help everyone around you remain calm as well. Evacuating your home will be a stressful time, but with a bit of preparedness, it doesn’t have to be a time of chaos.

Download Free Emergency Checklist

Source:  http://thesurvivalmom.com/checklist-for-evacuations/