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What is your Compact Travel Squirrel Getter?

I found an amazing piece of survival equipment while working at a gun show this past weekend.  I picked up a Garcia Bronco .410 TakeDown Shot Gun in the original box and literature.  This amazingly simple shotgun was a survival weapon way before survival weapons were even an thing.  It was introduced in 1967  and produced until 1975 and came in either .22LR or .410 shotgun.  It was an updated version of the Hamilton Model 7 “Boy’s”rifle made circa 1900.  The Hamilton sold for $2.00 in 1900 and it’s predecessor Made by Firearms International Corp. sold In 1967 “The Bronco” for $9.95  using .22 shorts.

Here are some pictures.

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There are many modern rifles that have adopted similar designs.  Here are just a few.

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Ruger 10/22 TakeDown Rifle.  Shoots .22LR and a great backpacking rifle.  These rifles have a lot of upgrades available.

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The US Survival AR7 Rifle by Henry.  This may be the ultimate in compact design.  Semi-auto shooter comes with multiple magazines that easily stores in the stock and the best part it even floats.

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Here’s my Chiappa Little Badger folding rifle.  This heavy duty rifle somes in both .22LR and .22 Magnum.  The rifle above is a .22 Mag version with some cool customization.  Para cord weaving, red dot sight, threaded barrel accepts multiple accessories like flash suppressors or silencer, and you have creative license to customize how ever you see fit.

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Keltec Sub-2000.  Keltec makes some of the most unique weapons anywhere in the world.  This carbine rifle is 9mm parabellum and accepts Glock magazines.  You can also find this rifle in .40SW and multiple magazine types.  The rifle folds in half making it a very small package, perfect for a backpack.  Many companies make accessories for Keltec products.  My rifle above has a foregrip and front sight upgrade made by Red Lion Precision and a red dot optical sight and 33 round magazine.  There are other options available.  This rifle will take a standard handgun cartridge and make it deadly accurate out to 100 yards.

Luck have it, I own all these weapons and like each and everyone for different reasons.  The Little Badger for it size and .22 mag power, the Keltec for the tacticool factor, the Ruger for the bullet proof design, and the Garcia Bronc Shotgun for it’s nostalgia.

Find the right choice for you.  Any of the options you choose, the best one is the one you learn to use flawlessly.  Plan, Prepare, Protect.

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Traditional Rifles vs. AR

If you’re new to the sports of shooting and hunting, you’ve probably found yourself staring dumbfounded at the vast array of guns lining the walls of your local gun shop—wood-stocked long guns, carbon-fiber ARs and lever-action rifles that look straight out of a Western movie. Theoptions are endless.

So, what’s the difference between these guns? It’s quite simple and, depending on your intended use, you may find one option better suited to your uses than the other. Here are the most important differences between the two most popular rifle styles: AR and bolt action.

All About the AR
An AR rifle, or “modern sporting rifle,” is not just for the military or law enforcement. In fact, over the past decade, ARs have become a very popular firearm choice for hunting and target shooting. A lot of false information has created confusion on just what an AR rifle actually is and does, so it’s important to understand the platform.

Traditional Rifles vs. ARs

Over the past decade, it has become common to see AR platform rifles in hunting camps. The Savage MSR 15 Recon is chambered in .223 Wylde and features a barrel with 5R rifling—a killer combo for match grade accuracy.

“AR” does not stand for “assault rifle” or “automatic rifle.” In fact, the “AR”, as in AR-15, stands for “ArmaLite rifle,” with the name being adopted from the company that first developed this style of rifle in the 1950s. In reality, “assault rifles” are fully automatic (imagine a machine gun), and automatic firearms have been heavily restricted to civilians since 1934.

ARs use what is called a “semiauto action,” meaning that every time the trigger is pulled, a bullet is launched from the barrel, the case is automatically ejected, and another cartridge is immediately fed from the magazine into the firing chamber. Before another bullet can be fired, however, the trigger must be pulled again, and so the process is repeated.

The AR is versatile and exceptionally accurate. ARs consist of two main components commonly referred to as “upper” and “lower” receivers. The upper receiver of an AR is comprised of the barrel, chamber and handguard. This can easily be swapped for other uppers to chamber your rifle to different calibers by simply popping two pins. Chamberings for the AR platform include .22, .223 (5.56x45mm), 6.8 SPC, .308, .450 Bushmaster, and more.

Traditional Rifles vs. ARs

The modularity of AR platform rifles enables shooter to quickly change uppers for different calibers depending on the species being hunted.

The upper receiver is where the operating system of the gun is located. ARs can consist of two different operating systems: gas impingement and gas piston. With a gas impingement system, gas is diverted from the barrel through a tube and back into the upper receiver to operate the action. With a gas-piston operating system, gas is funneled from the barrel to drive a piston that works like the action.

The lower receiver consists of the buttstock and grip. These also can be changed to fit your needs. Not happy with your short stock? Looking for a grip with more traction? No problem. Swap them for a Blackhawk Knoxx Replacement Adjustable Carbine Rifle Buttstock, a Blackhawk AR-15 Ergonomic Grip, or a host of other accessories.

Along with those easy changes you can make, the AR can easily be tailored to individual shooters. Almost all of the components of an AR can be swapped out. Replace the stock trigger, buy a different gas block, add a Blackhawk offset flashlight rail mount or a Picatinny rail to mount a Blackhawk SPR Optics Mount for a scope, or simply change the handguard to fit your liking. The options are endless.

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Collapsible buttstocks make it easier to maneuver through thick brush, and can quickly be extended to make that perfect shot.

Bolt Gun Basics
Unlike the AR, which uses gases and a lot of moving parts to operate, a bolt gun has a much simpler design.

The traditional bolt gun uses a bolt-action system to fire. Unlike semiauto actions, where the cartridge automatically ejects when fired and then a new round is fed into the chamber, bolt guns require you to manually open the bolt, which ejects the cartridge. You then push the bolt forward, which drives the new round from the magazine into the firing chamber. This process must be repeated each time before firing a new round. Because bolt guns have fewer moving mechanical parts and don’t require the use of gases to make the gun work, bolt guns are commonly believed to be more reliable than ARs.

Traditional Rifles vs. ARs

The classic beauty of a traditional bolt gun can be hard to beat. If a shooter is trying to decide between an AR or a traditional bolt gun – it all comes down to personal preference.

Unlike ARs, not as many components of a bolt gun can be swapped or added to the rifle. Commonly made with wood, laminate, and composite stocks, bolt-action rifles do allow some customization, including replaceable stocks, triggers, and scope mounts.

Additionally, bolt-action rifles can be chambered in dozens of different calibers. The 16/116 Savage Lightweight Hunter bolt-action rifle, for example, is available in .223 Rem., .243 Win., .270 Win., .308 Win., 6.5 Creedmoor, and 7mm-08 Rem. Numerous other calibers are available for bolt-action rifles for use on big game that range in size from deer to elk including .30-06, .300 Win. Mag., and .338 Win. Mag., all the way down to small game such as squirrels or coyotes with rounds including .22 or .17 Hornet.

Which One is For You?
Between the modularity of the AR, which allows you to customize it to your preferences, and the reliability of a bolt-action rifle, you really can’t go wrong with either. I’ve hunted bears in the backcountry while carrying the Lightweight Hunter chambered in .270 and walked away with a beautiful black bear shot at 230 yards. My friend and fellow bear hunter, David Faubion, carried an AR on the same hunt, and he walked away with an old sow. Both guns performed as promised, and I came to one conclusion: You can’t go wrong by buying one of each.

Shared from gunsandammo.com

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The Most Unsuspecting Rifle you NEED in your Survival Preps

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Bigger doesn’t always mean better in survival and this rifle is a perfect demonstration of that concept.  No, I’m not talking about owning a 22 caliber rifle – although those are excellent as well.  What I’m talking about is something even simpler, cheaper and more effective!

An Air Rifle – The Perfect Survival Tool

When you think about preppers and survivalists, I would argue AR-15s and AK47s come to mind in the firearm/security arena.  While these are great for battle files, they are not very practical for other aspects of survival – mostly hunting.

Many of the downsides to having a hunting or battle rifle are:

  • The rifle is heavy
  • Rifles are expensive
  • The shot is very loud
  • Ammo is expensive and sometimes difficult to find.  This is especially true with 22 caliber rounds today.
  • Ammo is heavy and takes up room
  • You normally don’t have frequent opportunities to catch big game.

Now, let’s look at an Air Rifle for hunting:

  • Some are heavy, but comparably less weight to a real rifle.
  • Some models accept 22 caliber pellets and can shoot as fast as a 22 rifle (feet per second).
  • Although some cost as much as a real rifle, the majority cost significantly less (hundreds of dollars less)!
  • The shot is not nearly as loud as a rifle
  • Ammo is incredibly cheap!!  1000 rounds cost a mere $15 at some retailers!
  • Ammo is plentiful!!  I can’t imagine people bum-rushing the store for air pellets if another democrat president takes office.
  • The ammo  is very small.  A handful of pellets can equal several magazines for a rifle.
  • Since it’s not classified as a “real gun” making a homemade silencer for the air gun is legal.  However, please check with ATF regulations.  There are some instances of where a jury convicted a person who made a homemade air gun silencer simply because it “could have” easily attached and been used as a silencer for a real firearm.
  • Small game is everywhere in a survival situation.  Birds perched on branches, squirrels, rabbits, possums and more can easily be taken down with a pellet rifle.
  • It’s a great way to teach kids firearm safety prior to progressing to a 22 rifle or higher caliber.

So, you see…a pellet rifle is an amazing tool for acquiring food for the table in a SHTF event, or even a long drawn out depressionary phase.  I own one myself, and would most likely find myself using it and conibear traps to put the majority of the food on the table.

A popular model of airgun selling on amazon is the GAMO 0.177 Caliber Hornet rifle that shoots at 1200 FPS. It has a single break-barrel cocking system which I really enjoy.  Personally, I think that’s the only type you should look at.  You do not want to be pumping a lever 20-40 times, nor rely on Co2 cartridges for your propellant.

Gamo also makes a very popular air rifle with built in suppressor that reduces the noise by 50% Gamo also makes a very popular air rifle with built in suppressor that reduces the noise by 50% And, as I stated before, pellets like this 1250 count of 0.177 caliber crossman pack are only $15. And, as I stated before, pellets like this 1250 count of 0.177 caliber crossman pack are only $15.

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The above setup costs  a mere $115.  However, as always with any sport, there are much more durable and high performing air rifles available at higher prices.  Vendors like MidwayUSA or AirGun Depot have a very broad selection of air rifles.

Lastly,  must make mention that you should not look into “Airsoft Rifles”.  These rifles typically operate at much lower velocities and require springs, gas or electricity to propel the bb’s.  When researching, make sure you are going for a “air pellet rifle” and not a “bb gun” or “Airsoft” rifle.

Summary

I honestly think all preppers should have an air rifle because of how useful they can be, and how cheap and readily available they are.  As I discussed in my article “Prepping for a slow collapse vs. a BIG event”, a slow depression might be the way our country crumbles.  By having an airsoft rifle, snares, and conibear traps, you can easily help feed your family with small game.